ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Weekly NotesSubscribe to Weekly Notes

Doing without Sulphur

February 25, 1967 tonne) than in other countries (above Rs 1,000). Partly, this is due to tied credits and reliance on turn-key contracts. But this lesson we have yet to learn, as the experience of Bokaro and the proposed expansion of Dur- gapur shows.

Coaching Our Homework

February 25. 1967 But Lahiri has won. Each of the leftist candidates has polled more votes individually than the Congress candidate. So it seems that people are still prepared to vote for a person who is known to be honest and opposed sincerely to Congress policies, irrespective of his organisation. They are not unduly influenced by the force majeure of either petty bribes or unreasoning hatred. The ball is now back in the court of the leftist politicians: they have to take this opportunity to work for the socialism that they all preach. For this, they will have to bury their petty personal quarrels and give up the habit of fighting shadows. Can they do it? Can reason and sanity play a larger part in West Bengal politics than it has done in recent years?

The Ball in Leftists Court

Purge by Ballot A Correspondent writes: THE ELECTIONS have put an end, not to Congress rule, but to the near*permanent political zamindari which the Congress acquired in 1947. The electorate has, in an unprecedented and remarkably disciplined turn-out, cleaned the establishment of politicians identified for long with power positions. The ballot box has saved the country from violent revolutions as well as from ossified party caucuses. And defeated ministers have respected the ballot box by handing in their resignations promptly. The first reaction to the election results, therefore, is that the masses have re-asserted their faith in the democratic mechanism. They have refused to tolerate all present rulers as inevitable or indispensable, and have also refused, for the time being at any rate, to usher in a new set-up by means other than elections

State Trading Goes to the Head

February 25. 1967 But Lahiri has won. Each of the leftist candidates has polled more votes individually than the Congress candidate. So it seems that people are still prepared to vote for a person who is known to be honest and opposed sincerely to Congress policies, irrespective of his organisation. They are not unduly influenced by the force majeure of either petty bribes or unreasoning hatred. The ball is now back in the court of the leftist politicians: they have to take this opportunity to work for the socialism that they all preach. For this, they will have to bury their petty personal quarrels and give up the habit of fighting shadows. Can they do it? Can reason and sanity play a larger part in West Bengal politics than it has done in recent years?

Development of Kanpur, a U S Concern

February 18, 1967 term modernisation programmes; it recommends tariff arrangements conducive to a well-distributed load factor. At the purely technical level it suggests methods for maximising the power factor and the plant factor, and various other specifically technical improvements.

Congress s Safest Haven

Passing of the Hump THE SCOPE of the Aid-India Consortium is being widened to include food, which had been kept out so far because it was covered by the special exigencies of PL 480 in the US and the prior arrangements of the Colombo Plan, under which wheat grants were given by Canada and Australia. This development was, perhaps, inevitable with the decline of US agricultural surpluses and the gradual withering away of the Colombo Plan. The insistence on arbitrarily defined "normal commercial imports'' as a condition of PL 480 aid and the enlargement of deficits in India itself, in any event, made an impact on the foreign exchange position which the Consortium could not possibly ignore. The broader idea of the Consortium covering the whole economy is a mixed blessing even from the viewpoint of those devoted to the hump theory of massive foreign aid. It ensures

Towards Credit Planning

offer and left the Congress to contest the elections as opposition candidates or as independents. In Maharashtra by contrast some of the opposition ML As who joined Congress were denied Congress tickets. The market for Congress tickets was evidently very strong in Maharashtra.

Setting the Example en Power

offer and left the Congress to contest the elections as opposition candidates or as independents. In Maharashtra by contrast some of the opposition ML As who joined Congress were denied Congress tickets. The market for Congress tickets was evidently very strong in Maharashtra.

Passing of the Hump

Passing of the Hump THE SCOPE of the Aid-India Consortium is being widened to include food, which had been kept out so far because it was covered by the special exigencies of PL 480 in the US and the prior arrangements of the Colombo Plan, under which wheat grants were given by Canada and Australia. This development was, perhaps, inevitable with the decline of US agricultural surpluses and the gradual withering away of the Colombo Plan. The insistence on arbitrarily defined "normal commercial imports'' as a condition of PL 480 aid and the enlargement of deficits in India itself, in any event, made an impact on the foreign exchange position which the Consortium could not possibly ignore. The broader idea of the Consortium covering the whole economy is a mixed blessing even from the viewpoint of those devoted to the hump theory of massive foreign aid. It ensures

After Half a Century, an Unnoticed Notification

February 11, 1967 to ditch the Commonwealth? And what about Britain's role as banker to the world? Britain held sterling for other countries and some of these could conceivably cause a run on the currency, thus dragging Britain's European partners into ruin. What guarantees could Wilson give that such a contingency could be met without upsetting the European credit system?

Takeover of Banks in Tanzania

The difference in the trend of disclosed profits between the State Bank and the private banks is striking since all banks faced similar business conditions in 1966. In fact, there is reason to believe that profit figures of the private banks have been tailored through informal agreement among bankers. This need cause no raising of eyebrows since it is a usual practice among banks.

Pages

Back to Top