ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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No Succour for Teacher

March 18,1967 cies will probably be hammered out in due course. The one positive aspect of the situation is that Indira Gandhi has emerged out of the leadership tussle as an effective leader in her own right and has chosen a cabinet which will be personally loyal to her so that in future her wishes are less likely to be thwarted by group pulls. Other pulls caused by the larger balance of political and social forces in the country are a different matter altogether and their impact on policy will, of course, remain. But that is not the same thing as the existence within the Cabinet itself of groups and factions which in their tussle distorted policies and held up their implementation.

Gujarat s New Ministry

March 18,1967 cies will probably be hammered out in due course. The one positive aspect of the situation is that Indira Gandhi has emerged out of the leadership tussle as an effective leader in her own right and has chosen a cabinet which will be personally loyal to her so that in future her wishes are less likely to be thwarted by group pulls. Other pulls caused by the larger balance of political and social forces in the country are a different matter altogether and their impact on policy will, of course, remain. But that is not the same thing as the existence within the Cabinet itself of groups and factions which in their tussle distorted policies and held up their implementation.

Funds for Land Development Banks

narrow grooves in which the new Governmental leadership continues to move. The only silver lining for the Indira Government

The Angry Young Voter

The Angry Young Voter A Correspondent writes: APPROXIMATELY one-sixth (and possibly a little more) of the total electorate in India's fourth elections were persons born between 1941 and 1945. The memories of this section of the electorate will have registered only the post-Independence events in the country. Eligible to vote for the first time, this group of about 40 million has probably played an important role in deciding the outcome of the recent elections

Rubber Not Elastic Enough

 fear that is responsible, in the first place, far the drafting of a non- proliferation treaty, that would neatly prevent the Germans from getting their hands on atomic bombs. But both Britain and the United States are in no position to hold the Germans down. For one thing, the Germans are not the strong economic giants they once were; for another, the Germans have been claiming that they have donned sack cloth and ashes for long enough and should no more be treated as pariahs. Besides, say the Germans, if the western powers do not want them to go in for their own nuclear rearmament, why not at least give them the satisfaction of having a finger on the NATO nuclear trigger?

Public Sector in Banking

The Angry Young Voter A Correspondent writes: APPROXIMATELY one-sixth (and possibly a little more) of the total electorate in India's fourth elections were persons born between 1941 and 1945. The memories of this section of the electorate will have registered only the post-Independence events in the country. Eligible to vote for the first time, this group of about 40 million has probably played an important role in deciding the outcome of the recent elections

Banks Score on Bonus issue

 It declined from 57 per cent in 1960 to 48 per cent in 1963 but then rose to 53 per cent in 1966. The latest ratio is lower than that of the State Bank itself and is, of course, substantially lower than that of other commercial banks. The initial decline was perhaps due to the cleaning up of substandard advances extended before take-over. The increase since then remains moderate. Is this because the State Bank looks upon its subsidiaries as agencies primarily for deposit mobilisation and opening of relatively inexpensive branches rather than for somewhat more normal banking activity or because greater centralisation of management is adversely affecting the operations of subsidiaries?

Where Congress Is Still Safe

 It declined from 57 per cent in 1960 to 48 per cent in 1963 but then rose to 53 per cent in 1966. The latest ratio is lower than that of the State Bank itself and is, of course, substantially lower than that of other commercial banks. The initial decline was perhaps due to the cleaning up of substandard advances extended before take-over. The increase since then remains moderate. Is this because the State Bank looks upon its subsidiaries as agencies primarily for deposit mobilisation and opening of relatively inexpensive branches rather than for somewhat more normal banking activity or because greater centralisation of management is adversely affecting the operations of subsidiaries?

A Cruel Choice

March 4, 1967 has been to state that it is prepared to join other nuclear powers in a commitment to make available nuclear explosive services to those who want them for peaceful purposes under proper international safeguards. This is adding insult to injury.

A Realistic Plan for Calcutta

If any party needs change of leader- ship or any country the Congress and the country India. At the time of her election in Jan- uary last year it was frankly conceded that a vital point in Indira Gandhi's favour was her suspected ability to bring in the votes for the Congress in the elections. This expectation has proved to be without basis. Indira Gandhi may have won her own election comfortably, but it does not seem as if her being Prime Minister instead of somebody else has brought any harvest of votes to the party. And the acrimonious debate at this week's meeting of the Congress Working Committee over whether it was the Government or the party which was to blame for the election debacle notwithstanding, the fact remains that the opposition did take as their main election planks the mishandling of the food situation, the steep rise in prices, and the acknowledged stagnation in the economy, for none of which can the Government escape responsibility.

The Rather Severe Limits of an Income Policy

If any party needs change of leader- ship or any country the Congress and the country India. At the time of her election in Jan- uary last year it was frankly conceded that a vital point in Indira Gandhi's favour was her suspected ability to bring in the votes for the Congress in the elections. This expectation has proved to be without basis. Indira Gandhi may have won her own election comfortably, but it does not seem as if her being Prime Minister instead of somebody else has brought any harvest of votes to the party. And the acrimonious debate at this week's meeting of the Congress Working Committee over whether it was the Government or the party which was to blame for the election debacle notwithstanding, the fact remains that the opposition did take as their main election planks the mishandling of the food situation, the steep rise in prices, and the acknowledged stagnation in the economy, for none of which can the Government escape responsibility.

Purge by Ballot

Purge by Ballot A Correspondent writes: THE ELECTIONS have put an end, not to Congress rule, but to the near*permanent political zamindari which the Congress acquired in 1947. The electorate has, in an unprecedented and remarkably disciplined turn-out, cleaned the establishment of politicians identified for long with power positions. The ballot box has saved the country from violent revolutions as well as from ossified party caucuses. And defeated ministers have respected the ballot box by handing in their resignations promptly. The first reaction to the election results, therefore, is that the masses have re-asserted their faith in the democratic mechanism. They have refused to tolerate all present rulers as inevitable or indispensable, and have also refused, for the time being at any rate, to usher in a new set-up by means other than elections

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