ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Groundnut Extension Shows the Way

August 12, 1967 phatic that there was "no conclusive evidence" that Smith, with the authority of his Rhodesia front colleagues, was "prepared to enter into meaningful discussions" leading to a satisfactory solution. Yet Alport, it would seem, thought that Smith is willing to 'consider "one or .two points'' in the Tiger' constitution which he thinks are reasonable. It has not been made clear, however, what those points are and whether they satisfy Britain's stand of, no independence before majority African rule (NIBMAR). Nor was Alport; according to Wilson, "in a position to bring back any guarantee that, if any, meaningful agreement were to emenge Mr Smith would not once again, as after Tiger, be overruled by the extremist members of his regime". In the circumstances, what is sought to be achieved by the Rhodesian Governor's probing talks with Smith?

Hotels and Foreign Collaboration

settlements have been completed" in an area of 80,000 square miles. As for educational and medical facilities, the less said the better. There is only one high school with some 200 students; primary schools number 192 with about 13,000 students. As to the number of teachers, the Report is silent. There are 6 hospitals and 12 primary health centres.

Myopia on Jute

riers will have to be able to offer really cheap transport for Indian ore to Japan. In fact, the Japanese, aware of the importance of cheap transport and of our foreign exchange difficulties in building up the necessary shipping services, are understood to have offered to establish joint shipping companies in India to operate bulk carriers to transport ore.

Price Support or Price Rigging

Price Support or Price Rigging? COAL PRODUCERS will have only themselves to blame if they do not accept the con- sequences of decontrol. Reports that the Joint Working Committee of the industry is considering transforming itself into a consortium to fetch higher than market prices which are justified by the demand and supply position do not augur too well. The Joint Working Committee was formed in 1961 by the several associations of mineowners to process the ill-fated foreign ex- change loan extended by the World Bank for private sector coal development. It has continued in existence mainly as a common forum to bring about some sort of reconciliation between the conflicting interests of the various mining associations, and it has been dominated by the larger collieries. Since distribution controls will be retained for the time being on deliveries to railways and steel plants, the focal point of the anticipated agreement between producers will consist of putting up a joint front against these hulk buyers. Steel plants generally get their coal from only a few better grade producers; but railways, which consume comparatively inferior grades, have to deal with a much larger number of producers who are in no position individually to bargain against the might of the railways. By combining in common interest, it would be possible for the various kinds and sizes of producers to get along together.

Standing at Ease on Rhodesia

settlements have been completed" in an area of 80,000 square miles. As for educational and medical facilities, the less said the better. There is only one high school with some 200 students; primary schools number 192 with about 13,000 students. As to the number of teachers, the Report is silent. There are 6 hospitals and 12 primary health centres.

Tramps and Ports

Price Support or Price Rigging? COAL PRODUCERS will have only themselves to blame if they do not accept the con- sequences of decontrol. Reports that the Joint Working Committee of the industry is considering transforming itself into a consortium to fetch higher than market prices which are justified by the demand and supply position do not augur too well. The Joint Working Committee was formed in 1961 by the several associations of mineowners to process the ill-fated foreign ex- change loan extended by the World Bank for private sector coal development. It has continued in existence mainly as a common forum to bring about some sort of reconciliation between the conflicting interests of the various mining associations, and it has been dominated by the larger collieries. Since distribution controls will be retained for the time being on deliveries to railways and steel plants, the focal point of the anticipated agreement between producers will consist of putting up a joint front against these hulk buyers. Steel plants generally get their coal from only a few better grade producers; but railways, which consume comparatively inferior grades, have to deal with a much larger number of producers who are in no position individually to bargain against the might of the railways. By combining in common interest, it would be possible for the various kinds and sizes of producers to get along together.

Uganda Obote s Politics

riers will have to be able to offer really cheap transport for Indian ore to Japan. In fact, the Japanese, aware of the importance of cheap transport and of our foreign exchange difficulties in building up the necessary shipping services, are understood to have offered to establish joint shipping companies in India to operate bulk carriers to transport ore.

A Tragedy Called Dandakaranya

 thus became Uganda's first Prime Minister, More recently, however, there have been dissensions in Obote's camp. Over the past three months, the Minister for Agriculture and Co-operatives (Obote's own cousin) resigned from the Cabinet; his resignation was followed a few weeks later by the resignation of the Attorney General; and a few weeks after this came the dismissal of a prominent Cabinet Minister who had moss following in his own constituency and who had held the portfolio of Planning and Economic Development. All the three men had differed sharply with Obote on the new constitutional proposals.

Cold Season for Sterling

August 12, 1967 Cold Season for Sterling STERLING is again under pressure

Industrial Licensing for the Undergraduate

top leadership of the Congress signs of an imminent rupture. A degree of mutual tolerance among the groups is enjoined by the fact that the defection of any one of the factions would be enough to upset the applecart of Congress power in New Delhi. There is also another limiting factor in operation which does not apply in the case of State politics. That is the absence of even loose unity among the Opposition groups in Parliament. Differences on domestic and international issues between the Left wing and Right wing MPs is sharp leaving little room for a Cha- ran Singh or a Rajmata to do the trick.

War in Vietnam

August 5, 1967 Inevitably the Report pays obeisance to the efficacy of more commissions and committees. Thus a high power industrial commission becomes a useful substitute for action. It is also suggested that an annual evaluation report on the Plan to Parliament would "enable Members to have more informed discussions and offer constructive suggestions which would no doubt prove of great value to the Planning Commission and the Government in finalising the contents and strategy of the Plan for the following year". But surely the Committee's draftsmen have slipped up, for one looks in vain through the report for a recommendation for drawing up annual Plans the performance of which could then be evaluated.

A Balance-Sheet Too Lata

top leadership of the Congress signs of an imminent rupture. A degree of mutual tolerance among the groups is enjoined by the fact that the defection of any one of the factions would be enough to upset the applecart of Congress power in New Delhi. There is also another limiting factor in operation which does not apply in the case of State politics. That is the absence of even loose unity among the Opposition groups in Parliament. Differences on domestic and international issues between the Left wing and Right wing MPs is sharp leaving little room for a Cha- ran Singh or a Rajmata to do the trick.

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