ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Collective Dreaming

The process of Vikalp Sangam (Alternatives Confluence) involves visioning of an ideal built on grounded initiatives, spanning the full range of alternative approaches to justice, equity, and sustainability. The focus is on India, but the lessons and visions emerging are relevant globally. It attempts to document, network, and create collaborations amongst movements and groups involved in such alternatives.

Technology Vision 2035

“Technology Vision 2035,” developed by the Technology Information, Forecasting and Assessment Council, claims to identify key challenges and needs of India and describe its technology capability landscape in 2035. It is important to understand the backstage process of participation in the development of this vision document, and bring forth the imagination of the citizen underlining the vision’s horizon. In the context of its “diversity” claims, it is essential to ask if one vision is really possible for such a huge and diverse country, or should we be talking, instead, of many visions, and a diversity of visions?

The Fight against Mosquitoes

Technoscientific visions deeply inform the envisioning of the public health policy. Currently, multiple approaches are under development in the fight against mosquito-borne diseases, including dengue and chikungunya. Though controversial, the advanced biological control approach has re-emerged as a strong alternative in the last decade and is shaping the trajectory of technological change in the fight against mosquitoes and associated vector-borne diseases. Since these efforts might change the way India manages its huge infectious disease burden in the long term, it is important to understand how certain technoscientific visions and ideas persist even while being controversial. The contestations surrounding technologies employing the advanced biological control approach are examined in an attempt to address this.

Whose Knowledge Counts?

Beyond the obvious claims of evidence-based research policy is the lesser-questioned claim of what qualifies as evidence. This requires an understanding of the politics of knowledge and examining knowledge claims made both for and against any particular innovation. Through the case of a specific agroecological innovation, the System of Rice Intensification in India, the barriers to a sustainable transition from a green revolution to an agroecological paradigm that reveals path dependence on certain agricultural futures—such as the New Plant Type or genetic transformation in rice—are highlighted.

India’s Green Revolution and Beyond

The widely accepted “success” of India’s green revolution in making the country self-sufficient in foodgrains has made it the model for all agrarian futures envisioned in the country. This article argues that this vision of the future is based on a selective understanding of India’s agrarian past as backward and needing redemption. There is inadequate evidence to support the claim that India was food-insecure in the 1960s. Moreover, evidence suggests that India’s food and nutritional insecurities today are the aftermath of the green revolution strategy promoted since the 1960s. This article is a small contribution towards comprehensively outlining that past so that we can begin to imagine a new vision for India’s agrarian future.
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