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Why Cut Engineering Admissions

Why Cut Engineering Admissions? V N Kothari THERE is a proposal in official circles to cut admissions to engineering courses in 1968 by 30 per cent. This cut, it is said, would help case the increasing unemployment among engineers. This caim has no justification.

A Non-Policy on Non-Proliferation

all. Expenditure on it has been Rs 1.81 crores against the provision of Rs 2.87 crores and against the target of 4,73 lakh acres only 2.24 lakh acres have been covered.

Annual Plan 1968-69-Areas for Policy Action

 their apparent lack of interest in happenings in Vietnam. The news is covered in an almost casual manner. There is something ghoulish about this indifference. Statesman in this regard is a cut above the rest. The paper's foreign coverage, incidentally, is the best in the country, though it seems to have recalled its Washington correspondent and not replaced him. But Selig Harrison does a splendid inside job for the paper.

The Cost of Taking It Easy

March 9, 1968 RECESSION has cut into sales of commercial vehicles and most of the manufacturers have had to drastically reduce production. Bajaj-Tempo, which commenced production of its 4-wheerer delivery vans in October 1966, has been working much below its installed capacity of 4,000 vehicles (3-wheeiers and 4-wheelers), although it introduced in the market several new models such as station wagons, mini-buses, amburances and pick-up vans. The company has had to take on other work to keep its machine shop busy. Sales of commercial vehicles have lately started to pick up following appointment of additional dealers and inclusion of the Tempo Viking 4-wheelers in the DGS and D rate contract. The company is seeking a foreign exchange loan of Rs 28 lakhs from IFCl for import of balancing equipment to reach the installed capacity and to increase the indigenous content of vehicles. Efforts are also being made to further diversify the manufacturing programme. Results for the year to September 1967 turned out to be poor. Sales and machining charges together fetched 14 per cent more at Rs 2.54 crores but, with margins dropping by 4 points to around 61/2 per cent, gross profits fell by 13 per cent to Rs 16 lakhs. After providing for lull depreciation of Rs 23 lakhs-(Rs 9 lakhs), there is a deficit of Rs 6 lakhs. No dividend is recommended, therefore, for the fourth consecutive year.

Half a Dozen Vietnams

Half a Dozen Vietnams Ashok Rudra WHAT the United States of America faces in Vietnam is a halt to the steady course of victorious progress it has known during the last several years in its struggle for the containment of communism and for world domination. Ever since Krushchev's capitulation over Cuba, the United States has undoubtedly and decisively been the winning side in its titanic struggle for power with the Soviet Union. It has been able to use the tactic of nuclear blackmail to neutralise USSR intervention in one problem spot after another. The tacit agreement between the two super powers to avoid any frontal clash has meant, in actual practice, the USA getting away with all types of direct and indirect, military and non-military, interventions without any matching counter-moves by the USSR. The disastrous defeat of the Arab armies in last summer's almost comic five-day war and the almost total destruction of the Soviet-built UAR military might has also to be treated as a major setback for Soviet strategy. It is not only the USSR that has been reduced to the role of a passive spectator before this rise of American Imperialism to unchallenged supremacy. China, with all its tall talk, has continued to allow itself to be policed by the American Seventh Fleet and has cautiously held its hand over Formosa, Hong, Kong and, of course, Vietnam.

A Crucial Budget

A Crucial Budget WHAT is the 1968-69 Union Budget supposed to aim at? The Fourth Plan is in abeyance for the whole of next year. Whether or not that amounts to a plan holiday is a matter for polemists to debate. The question that must be bothering the Finance Minister right now, and for several weeks past, is: what policy objectives should his next budget seek to fulfil?

The Pueblo Episode

February 3, 1968 in the next session". Thus Kumaraman- galam is wrong to say that the power of the Governor to prorogue and convene the Legislature can be exercised only on the advice of his Council of Ministers. The Constitution has given enough powers to the Governor to summon the Legislature whenever he wants, the only condition being that a period of six months should not lapse between two meetings. Dharma Vira did give a fair chance to Ajoy Mukherjee to convene a session of the West Bengal State Legislature when doubts had arisen about the Government's majority. In the face of Ajoy Mukherjee's refusal to do this what could a conscientious Governor do?

Hingeleash

bitant prices are thus unlikely to last long, and a parity of sorts will be maintained between the northern and southern prices. On the other hand, the absence of a freight pool will enable new entrants and units contemplating expansion to balance the economics of proximity to markets with the economics of proximity to raw materials in locating their plants.

End of Honeymoon

resources, the short-sighted views expressed, by the Chief Ministers in the National Development Council. Perhaps, the obsession is unhealthy. May be. But it doesn't seem all that unhealthy if you look at India from this Capital city. December 4.

De Gaulle s Pound of Flesh

December 2, 1967 the CPI(M) in Kerala, the DMK in Madras and the Swatantra in Orissa will continue to rule and that these territories be treated as lost. Probably, in order to prevent a continental polarisation between the Right and Left, which would lead to grave instability and rob the Congress Party of its very relevant centrist role in a federal polity, the High Command may well consolidate and further build its rapport with these governments. A satisfied Namboodiripad and Annadurai could neutralise somewhat the dangerous repercussions of recent events in Bengal. Politicking certainly moves in strange ways in India.

Dissidents as Partners

Dissidents as Partners Ekalavya BHARATIYA KRANTI DAL which emerged from last week's conclave of ex-Congressmen in Indore is, as a political organisation, an advance over the Jana Congress formed in Delhi in December last. Jana Congress had to allow the different State parties of dissident Congressmen to retain their names and separate identities and, of course, decide on their candidates and election strategy. At Indore the party gave itself a new name, a flag and at least a preamble to a programme. It elected a chairman but postponed the election of an executive committee, leaving an 11-member steering committee chosen by the chairman in charge till next September or so by when, it is hoped, the party would be organised enough to hold elections at the State and Central levels.

After Ceasefire What

After Ceasefire What? Sankar N Maitra THE SIX-DAY WAR in the Middle East ended with a ceasefire three months ago but, peace has not yet descended on the Middle East. Meanwhile, there is not even an armistice but a curious no-war-no- peace which keeps nations in suspense.

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