ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Difference, Division, Desi Breeds

A fundamental question in economics as well as in adaptive evolutionary biology is when to use difference and when to use division in cost–benefit analysis. At times, decisions taken to maximise the cost–benefit ratio can be diametrically opposite to that to maximise the cost–benefit difference. Common people intuitively know when to maximise the ratio and when to maximise the difference. The contrasting history of hybrid versus “desi” breeds in agriculture as opposed to animal husbandry illustrates this point effectively.

CAA–NRC–NPR and Its Discontents

The Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019 is unconstitutional for its discriminatory and arbitrary provisions. The linked exercises of the National Population Register and the National Register of Citizens threaten to disenfranchise crores of people, rendering them stateless and without rights. The combination ofCAA withNPR–NRC would produce consequences that are detrimental to the stable and harmonious functioning of our society and policy.

Pradhan Mantri Mudra Yojana

The Pradhan Mantri Mudra Yojana is the government’s flagship refinance and guarantee scheme aimed at providing access to credit for non-corporate and informal enterprises. Analysing the available data, the performance of the PMMY against its objectives is assessed, and it is observed that the PMMY has not altered secular trends in lending to the target segments. The current scheme design for its ability to create the level of impact needed is questioned, and some ideas on how to accelerate impact are also discussed.

Envisioning the India of 2047

The graduates of universities eventually fit, by and large, into social positions as solid citizens. This is in spite of the deep uneasiness some of them may continue to have with the society. Many of them continue to translate their disaffection into creative and intellectual expressions within the contours of the existing order. Even the most “radical” of our universities have, over the years, produced multiple times more teachers, researchers, professionals, civil servants, journalists and development workers than they have produced anarchists and revolutionaries.

Comparing Floods in Kerala and the Himalaya

There are important similarities and differences between the Kerala floods in 2018 and 2019 and the Himalayan floods of Uttarakhand and Kashmir in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Most importantly, floods in Kerala are likely to affect the local ecology in some parts of the Western Ghats, whereas floods in the Himalayan regions will affect North India as a whole. However, both the regions have a fragile ecology that is threatened by ecological destruction and industrial development. Thus, the Central Water Commission and other government agencies should take a holistic view towards addressing floods and dam management in these regions.

Ahmedabad’s Impact on the Sabarmati River

The Sabarmati river water quality, upstream and downstream of Ahmedabad, is analysed to assess the impact of the city on the river water quality using monthly data from April 2011 to March 2017. The quality of river water when it enters the city is in keeping with prescribed norms, but the river is “dead” downstream. The impacts of water pollution caused by the city are borne by residents in the peri-urban areas.

The University that Made a Difference

The assault on students and faculty of Jawaharlal Nehru University has raised a number of questions about politics on the campuses of universities. When students protest the massive hike in fees and other recently formulated regressive procedures of university functioning, it cannot be dismissed as student politics. It is as much a protest against a prime university being systematically dismantled. JNU is now being reduced to a teaching shop because supporting the advancement of knowledge that it pursued, is not on the agenda of those in authority, nor is it a characteristic of the ideology that is being sought to be imposed.

Indian Statistical System in a Troubled State

The recent furore about key economic statistics in India could only dent the age-old reputation of the official statistical cadre. However, if government control continues trampling upon the autonomy and integrity of the official statistical institutions in the country in this manner, then their reputation of competence and impartiality stands the grave risk of being marred in no time.

Dominant Bodies and Their Ethical Performances

The everyday normalised brutality that dominant upper-caste bodies seem to inflict on Dalit Bahujans in elite higher educational institutions is addressed in this article. The reproduction of everyday institutional embodiment displays a direction and an intensity that allow dominant bodies to realise their undiminished being. This direction and intensity are supposedly expressed through the arts of living of the upper castes, namely the domains of cellular, intellectual, and social reproduction.

Re-engineering for Credibility

There has been a protracted belligerence over the new series of gross domestic product data denting the long-standing credibility of our statistical system. There is a need to not only come out of the present predicament, but also to find a way for enhancing credibility of official statistics. Such strategic actions for revamping the official statistical system, keeping in view the major challenges, are suggested.

Assam’s 2019 Verdict and the Anti-CAB Mobilisations

What explains the electoral success of the Bharatiya Janata Party in the general elections in Assam in the face of huge mobilisations against the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill? The failure of the mobilisations to project an alternative, the BJP’s hold among tea tribe communities, and the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh activism at the grassroots are possible reasons that blunted the impact of the anti-CAB mobilisations. However, ongoing protests against the Citizenship (Amendment) Act could unsettle the calculations of theBJP in Assam.

Towards a Trade Regime that Works for the Paris Agreement

Achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement on climate change requires support from the international trade system. The ways in which international trade policy could support climate policy, including legal changes at the World Trade Organization, procedural changes in institutions and practices, and use of plurilateral and regional trade agreements, are examined here. While it may be difficult to agree upon the legal changes, the procedural changes and plurilateral and regional agreements offer a clear way forward in the short to medium term.

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