ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Leveraging Liberalisation

Using the Indian cement industry as an example, this paper argues that there is a limit to leveraging liberalisation. Developing-country companies cannot match the clout of MNCs in controlling the global market. The Indian cement industry, which witnessed rapid production and capacity growth during the past two decades, has suffered a decline in exports in recent years as MNCs setting up shop in other developing countries retained their hold on international markets.

Small-Scale Units in the Era of Globalisation

This paper focuses on the ongoing changes in the business environment and the analysis of their implications for small-scale units. Specifically, it looks at possible ways of improving the competitive strength and commercial viability of small-scale units in the changing context. For this, substantial improvements will be needed in technology, such as mechanisation, organisation and information and the revamping of policy measures to encourage the growth of small units through collective efforts, ending their isolated mode of operation.

Indian Ocean Regionalism: Is There a Future?

The Indian Ocean Rim Association for Regional Cooperation was launched to affect a quicker process of liberalisation in countries disadvantaged in one way or other in the WTO regime, so that through open regional arrangements and agreements they could all gain quickly from the transforming trade and investment environment. An assessment of its five-year existence.

Case for Free Trade

Free Trade Today by Jagdish Bhagwati; Princeton University Press, 2002; published in India by Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2002; pp xiii + 128, Rs 295.

WTO and Indian Banking Sector: The Road Ahead

Increasing globalisation of trade under the WTO has provided India with a new opportunity as well as a necessity to strengthen her efforts at reforming her domestic financial sector. The real issue before India is how to obtain the best deal for herself in the current round of negotiations while seeking to reform her financial sector. In this paper the authors have identified six major issues that will come up for consideration in this round of WTO negotiations and made recommendations for India's response strategy by appropriately drawing lessons from the global experience in the opening up of the banking sector.

China's Membership of WTO

In sharp contrast to the perpetual grumbling in India about the WTO and the assertions now and then that India would be better off walking out of the organisation, China is making concerted efforts on all fronts to take the maximum advantage of its entry into the WTO.

China's Bleak Economic Picture

The potential and promise of the Chinese El Dorado is spellbinding but the murkier side is well-hidden.

Educational Services

Managing trade in educational services is an important issue for India, and much homework needs to be done before any commitments are made at the negotiating table under WTO's General Agreement on Trade in Services. While making specific proposals, India must also make adequate use of the safeguards provided in GATS to protect its own national interests.

Competitiveness through Privatisation

At a recent meet in Mumbai highlighting the disinvestment route taken by several countries in the developing world, Italian trade delegates to these countries emphasised the role of privatisation in opening up the economy as well as in helping the government raise resources.

Trade Facilitation: A Singapore Issue Knocking at WTO's Door

Trade facilitation is a Singapore issue that has been knocking at WTO's door for quite some time now. It is also an issue that has very wide ramifications and involves numerous stakeholders, its implications not being limited to any particular trade or industry. Trade facilitation on its own needs the attention of all stakeholders irrespective of what stance we ultimately adopt at the WTO negotiations. Therefore, in-depth examination of the issue, which will involve considerable time and detailed study, should be initiated urgently without waiting till we approach the next Ministerial at Mexico. The objective of this paper is to highlight the different aspects of the issue that need to be examined.

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