ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Productivity Growth in the Era of Debt, Diseases and Disasters

Global Productivity: Trends, Drivers and Policies edited by Alistair Dieppe, Washington, DC: World Bank (Advance Edition), 2020; pp xxiii + 389, price not indicated

Pandemic in the Eyes of the World Bank and the IMF

A damning critique does not allow India to remain self-complacent on the economic and health fronts.

Politics of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme

There is documentary evidence of the degeneration of the scientific basis of dealing with tubercul0sis as a public health problem in India. The outstanding research on TB in the past must not be forgotten by the authors of "Resource Optimisation for Tuberculosis Elimination in India" (EPW, 7 May 2016).

Majoritarian Rationale and Common Goals

Looking at existing policy instruments and goals, and the economic and social outcomes they promise to deliver, it is argued that majoritarian politics and social and cultural outcomes are not part of fringe thinking. The politics of hate actually works to build a consensus for ruling class economics. It is not surprising, therefore, that the only "nationalist outlook" of our times is to stand firmly behind the policy programme for the global investor.

Farmer Suicides in India's Breadbasket

Agrarian Distress and Farmer Suicides in North India by Lakhwinder Singh, Kesar Singh Bhangooand Rakesh Sharma; New Delhi: Routledge India;pp 229, ₹895.

Calcutta Diary

Unchanging India, and even the World Bank has now joined the troupe of excuse-mongers: India has been unable to reap the full advantages of liberalisation because of natural calamities that have befallen the country. Suppose some dull character were to ask whether the entire point of development was not to extricate the economy from the vicissitudes of nature, what answer would the mandarins, including the foreign ones, provide?

IMF Conditions Stunt Growth

The IMF-World Bank recipe for poverty reduction in Pakistan has been accompanied by stringent conditions that have often exacerbated the country's economic woes and failed to meet the lending institutions' own targets. Also, governments in Pakistan have always passed the blame for these harsh steps on to the Fund-Bank combine, thus ducking out of tough decisions on land reform, imposition of agricultural income tax and beefing up tax administration.

The Political Economy of Power

India has taken a long time to arrive at a reasonable direction for the improvement of the power sector. For long it has been difficult to strike a proper balance between the commercial viability of the sector and the imperative need to make power available even to those deficient in resources to pay for it. This paper discusses the various issues in the sector and the present state of the reforms programme. It sees some room for hope growing understanding of the sector that seems to have developed among policy-makers.

View from the Pavilion

From Reserve Bank to Finance Ministry and Beyond: Some Reminiscences by M Narasimham; UBSPDA, New Delhi, 2002; pp 189, Rs 395.

World Bank-CII Study on Competitiveness

The study should be seen as one of the first attempts to define and legitimise the second generation of economic reforms. However, the narrow definition of 'investment climate' employed in the study excludes several important factors that govern competitiveness, such as social infrastructure.

The Need to Be Heard

Voices of the Poor: Crying Out for Change by Deepa Narayan, Robert Chambers, Meera K Shah, Patti Petesch; Oxford University Press, 2000; pp 314

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