ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Women EmpowermentSubscribe to Women Empowerment

An Ode to Altruism

Feminists have demonstrated how the invisibility and lack of recognition of unpaid domestic and care work result in gender inequality and women’s disempowerment. Discussions of the role of law in reinforcing this invisibility is limited and focused on family law. This paper shall look at tort law, namely a review of compensation awarded to the dependents of homemakers, between 1968 and 2019, under the Indian Motor Vehicles Act, 1988. The growing recognition of women’s UDCW by Indian appellate courts, culminating in an influential Supreme Court decision in 2010, is traced. This “wages for housework” jurisprudence is then marshalled to probe the redistributive function of tort law.

Economic Cost of Gender Gap

To truly close the gender gap, gender equality must be mainstreamed into economic policymaking.

Performance of Self-help Groups in India

Since its inception, the performance of the self-help group programme in the area of rural development and women’s empowerment has been admirable. But, although the programme is being implemented in many parts of the country, its success has been patchy. This study evaluates its performance during 2011–19. It focuses on two aspects of the programme’s performance: its geographical expansion and the growth of non-performing assets. It shows that the programme has been more successful in well-off states, while in the central and north-eastern regions, it faces severe difficulties. The mounting NPAs in these regions require immediate intervention.

Women Writing

Storylines: Conversations with Women Writers edited by Ammu Joseph, Vasanth Kannabiran, Ritu Menon, Gouri Salvi, Volga; published by Women’s World(India), Delhi, and Asmita Resource Centre for Women, Hyderabad, 2003; pp 312, Rs 250. Tense Past, Tense Present: Women Writing in English edited by Joel Kurotti; published by Stree, an imprint of Bhatkal and Sen, Kolkata, 2003; pp 235, Rs 450.

Dalit Movement and Dalit International Conferences

The dalit movement now presents an even greater diversity than before and dalit women, who remain triply exploited on the basis of caste, class and gender, largely remain outside the movement's fold.

Work and Women's Identity

Experience and Identity by Anna Lindberg; published by the Department of History, Lund University, Sweden, 2001.
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