ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Gender Budgeting for Sustainable Development in India

The fifth Sustainable Development Goal mandates that India close its gender gap by 2030. An evaluation of gender budgeting as a whole and a diverse range of gender-sensitive interventions under the same (2005–06 to 2020–21) reveals severe shortcomings. First, a low and declining trend has been found in the shares of gender budgeting to total government expenditure, and women-specific schemes to total funds for gender budgeting. Second, the allocation of total funds for various schemes is either stagnating or declining, with some having received no funds over the last two consecutive years. Problems of design too persist, all contributing to a significant gender gap for Indian women vis-à-vis their male counterparts.

Deconstructing India’s Negotiating Dexterity

Does India Negotiate? by Karthik Nachiappan, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2019; pp 238, ` 1,295 (hardcover).

Caste and Race: Discrimination Based on Descent

In 2001, Dalit non-governmental organisations pushed for the inclusion of caste-based discrimination in the United Nations conference on racism and other forms of descent-based discriminations. How did the Government of India respond to the internationalisation of casteism? Why did Dalits want casteism to be treated on par with racism in the first place? Did they succeed? And above all, is caste the same as race?

Tax Reforms and Global Redistribution

The current international financial system needs an urgent overhaul as it continues to undermine workers’ rights. The recent agreement on the “Two-Pillar Approach” that aims to tackle global corporate tax avoidance and taxing the digital economy falls short of addressing the priorities of the global South, and threatens their sovereignty.

Distorted Narratives on Cuba

It is imperative that the inhuman blockade imposed by the United States is lifted.

Germany’s Apology to Namibia

Tracing the genesis of Germany’s apology for genocide in Namibia, this article situates Germany in the context of colonialism and racism in Africa. It contends that Germany is morally guilty of violating human rights but is legally not bound to pay reparations to Namibia. In order to promote humanitarian international law, institutions like the United Nations need to initiate measures to compensate the victims of genocide.

Israel’s Aggression on Palestine

Global action is required to restore the rights of the Palestinian people.

Vulnerable Humanity and Preparedness of Global Institutions

The Precipice: Existential Risk and the Future of Humanity by Toby Ord, New York: Hachette Books, 2020; pp 480, $18.99.

How Do We Rescue Human Rights from Rhetoric?

The human rights discourse today needs to introspect on how it can visualise competing degrees of resolution of human rights ideas advocated by different agents, without harming the principles that are worth retaining.

Region without Regionalism

Three decades have passed since the inception of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation. It still is virtually a non-starter and has not addressed any substantive issue. Intra-regional trade is minuscule. India and Pakistan show little interest in the organisation. Without judging their respective foreign policies, it is argued that South Asian regionalism is not on their agenda. Three questions arise: Is South Asia at all a region? How much does the strategic divide between India and Pakistan, with China factored in, come in the way of South Asian regionalism? Why should India bother about regionalism when its policy of bilateralism serves it fine? To probe these, the region's history, global perceptions of the region, India's foreign and educational practices, and interstate relationships are discussed.

Vernacular Nations

Postcolonial Asia offers at least seven types of states and nations. In their somewhat uncritical pursuit of total nationalism, territorial Asian states compete with their archipelagic cousins. The sea gypsy nations--spread across the South China Sea and other East Asian states--reject the monopoly of land as the only inhabitable space, discounting territory as an essential constituent of a nation. Ironically, while history kept them outside the fold of the territorial states, the present attempts to co-opt them. Only by challenging, as the Asian sea gypsies do, land's claim to being the sole inhabitable territory within law, and rethinking the sea as a place of danger can we truly vernacularise our statist imaginations.

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