ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

TerrorismSubscribe to Terrorism

India and the War against Terrorism

India's foreign minister has described the war against terrorism as between a coalition of democracies and terrorism. But that does not isolate terrorism. There are many countries which are not democratic or are semi-democratic whose support needs to be enlisted. India's main enemy today is not Pakistan, or Afghanistan, but terrorism. It should contribute in building the broadest possible anti-terrorist coalition.

'Terrible Tuesday': Worm's and Bird's Eye Views

There are two views, the worm's and the bird's on every event, including 'Terrible Tuesday'. The worm's (or the FBI's) view might tell us how the tragedy was planned and who were involved in the act. In contrast, the bird's (or the scholar's) view tells us why the tragedy occurred and how long it has been in the making. To make sense of the disaster we need to look at it from both angles.

War as Failure of Imagination

The war against terrorism threatens to make reason its first casualty and demands for justice are in danger of being reduced to thirst for revenge.

Terrorism: Eliminating the Sources

As the world moves to a new sensibility on terrorism in the wake of saturation coverage of the terrorist strikes on America and their aftermath, it has become fashionable in quite a few circles to characterise terrorism as the result of a clash of cultures. The cultures in question are identified, implicitly at least, as Islam and the west, the latter standing for modernity and the former cast as offender against reason and progress. The transparent irrationality of such an interpretation is not reason enough, in the Indian context, to dismiss it lightly. This is so because of the attraction such a characterisation of terrorism holds for sectarian ideologies that seek to target and isolate minority communities.

Lessons from Agra

After the trumpets and the fanfare has come the mournful dirge lamenting the ‘failure’ of the India-Pakistan summit at Agra. An expected reaction perhaps, but a trifle hasty. For after all, it would seem that the summit floundered on two old issues, cross border terrorism and the centrality of a resolution on Kashmir to the mitigation of IndiaPakistan tensions. Given this it is hard to see why there is such a desperate urgency about issuing a final report card on the summit. Surely, the two days of president Musharaff’s visit were not expected to unravel the many snags and snarls in the fabric of India-Pakistan relationship? Then again, in the light of the history of other high-level meetings between the two countries, the success or failure of a summit can only be reckoned by what happens afterwards. And in that sense surely it is too early to issue a report card on Agra?

How Media Manipulates Truth about Terrorism

The mainstream western media projects Islam as inimical to civilised values. The demonising of Islam fits in well with the western geo-political interests in arms and oil Today, after the demise of communist states, when Islam is being seen as a security threat to the west, the media in the Muslim world needs to devise ways and means to reduce the dependency on western news sources.

Pages

Back to Top