ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

TalibanSubscribe to Taliban

Strategic Dissonance in Afghanistan and a Way Forward

The historical background of recent events in Afghanistan is examined, and its relevance to India’s foreign and security policy is analysed.

Rescripting India’s Engagement with Afghanistan

The ways of rescripting India’s language of engagement with non-state armed groups like the Taliban are discussed. The engagement essentially does not accord moral legitimacy to acts of violence by the Taliban, but pushes for refashioning India’s image from being an “alien” other to a “differentiated” other.

India’s Afghan Policy: Challenges and Anxieties

India can only wait patiently and watch the situation in Afghanistan before initiating any action.

Afghanistan: Present Tense, Future Imperfect

The Taliban takeover cannot be understood outside the hegemonic economic and geopolitical interests.

What Will It Take to Rebuild Afghanistan?

This reading list assesses the possible course ahead for Afghanistan after the United States' withdrawal from the region.

Pakistan in the Post-Taliban Present

The political leadership in Pakistan, even when democracy has grown and strengthened, has limited writ over what it can do regarding what the military considers its terrain. The Taliban may have been partially eliminated, but other equally odious militants continue to find protection through some organisations and individuals in the military. Dealing with the threats to Pakistan’s future and stability entails a deeper look within rather than blaming India or Afghanistan.

Unheard Melodies from Afghanistan

An extremely well-researched report prepared by an expert on Afghan music and brought out by the Copenhagen-based Freemuse not only sheds light on the state of music and musicians of Afghanistan at a critical juncture of history, but also provokes wider questions about the basic relationship between artistes and religious and political bigots.

Afghanistan and the Vietnam Syndrome

Despite public support to root out the al Qaida network and depose the Taliban, the Bush administration will be mistaken if it believes that the Vietnam syndrome - a public aversion to unnecessary foreign adventures - is obsolete. The degree of domestic dissent will depend on how carefully the US conducts its Afghan operations.

India and the War against Terrorism

India's foreign minister has described the war against terrorism as between a coalition of democracies and terrorism. But that does not isolate terrorism. There are many countries which are not democratic or are semi-democratic whose support needs to be enlisted. India's main enemy today is not Pakistan, or Afghanistan, but terrorism. It should contribute in building the broadest possible anti-terrorist coalition.

War as Failure of Imagination

The war against terrorism threatens to make reason its first casualty and demands for justice are in danger of being reduced to thirst for revenge.

Afghan Armageddon?

Short of the Taliban graciously handing over Osama bin Laden and his rabble no imaginable act of appeasement can stay the hand of the US military. But pure retaliation will not suffice. Ample ploughshares must accompany the shiny high tech swords if the hatreds that steered the fatal airliners are to be stemmed rather than stoked.

Pages

Back to Top