ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles By South Asia

Pandemic, Protests, and Workers: India and Sri Lanka Considered

The climate of protest currently characterising India and Sri Lanka continues to receive staccato scholarly attention with barely any attempt to peak into either contemporary history or significant workers’ participation by way of explanation. Both regimes have pushed the pandemic as the proximate reason for the economic downturn in their countries even though the individual national trajectories have been vastly different—as we detail below.

India has a Responsibility towards Myanmar Refugees in India

Since the military takeover of power in Myanmar at the beginning of last year, widespread violence, internal displacement, chaos, and human misery has set off a catastrophic refugee crisis in South Asia. As the military crackdown on protesting civilian shows no signs of abating, thousands of Myanmar citizens have left their homes without any hope of returning soon. Of those who fled Myanmar, many sought asylums in India. However, while India condemned the coup and the ongoing violence, it has shown scant regard to the protection of the rights of asylum-seekers. Even after a year since the coup, India refuses to accept those who crossed the border out of fear of persecution at the hands of the military as refugees. This article focuses on India’s obligations towards the refugees staying in the country. It argues that despite India being a non-signatory to the 1951 United Nations Refugee Convention and the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees, India’s constitutional principles, refugee-related judicial pronouncements, and the various international conventions it has adopted obligate it to protect the refugees on its soil.