ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles By Social exclusion

Child Labour and Social Exclusion

A four-good, four-factor general equilibrium trade-theoretic model is utilised that incorporates social exclusion, consumption disaggregation and child labour. In this framework, trickle-down economics fails and under very plausible conditions, socially excluded families and their children are impoverished by capital accumulation. Policies such as a ban on child labour have differential effects on the economy. Specifically, a ban on child labour in the traded goods sector necessarily improves the welfare of the socially excluded families and their children. However, a ban on child labour in the non-traded goods sector has ambiguous implications for the welfare of the excluded group. Thus, this paper highlights the importance of disaggregation and social exclusion for policymaking.

Caste and Power in Villages of Colonial Bengal

An exposition of four court cases demonstrates that by the late 1920s, the educated middle classes wielded the colonial state apparatus. Moreover, the colonial state had partially delinked the premodern affiliation of local muscle to the local hubs of power. Therefore, at the village level, local malcontents were isolated and booked for lawbreaking. Villagers/village communities were located within a caste-based social structure, though caste hierarchies in Tamluk seemed more fluid. They also had the option to activate the (ideally) caste-neutral state apparatus, which sharpened their perceptions of legal subjectivity, and increased their stake in the government.

Caste, Contemporaneity and Assertion

This article is in response to the opinions and views expressed in the “Caste and Class” special (EPW, 19 November 2016). An evolutionary and historical method has not helped us to understand the caste system and its exploitative nature in its entirety. Therefore, we need to analyse it from a new perspective which can explain the caste system by critically looking at assertion of both, the so-called upper castes and Dalits together.