ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Violence in Times of COVID-19 Lack of Legal Protection for Women Informal Workers

The present article is contextualised within the increasing cases of violence and harassment in the lives of women workers in the informal sector and deeply entrenched labour market discrimination in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. The article tries to analyse the impact of the pandemic particularly on the women workers in the informal sector through an examination of existing legal protection measures, access to social security and the issue of violence and harassment.

Do Courts Rely on Stereotypes Instead of Legal Frameworks in Cases of Sexual Harassment?

The fear of women filing false complaints continues to be one of the principal oppositions to the existence of the law against sexual harassment. Through an analysis of a 2019 high court judgment that ruled a complaint to be “false,” the author argues that courts often do not differentiate between a complaint filed with “malicious intent” and one where the complaint could not be supported with evidence permissible to the court.

Sexual Harassment at the Workplace: What Kind of Change Do Internal Committees Need?

Sexual harassment at the workplace and educational institutions is mired in complex power dynamics that often silence women. In order to subvert the power dynamics that hamper the effectiveness of the internal committees, the aims and objectives of these civil redressal mechanisms need to be reassessed.

PUDR Issues Statement Against 'Supreme Injustice' in Sexual Harassment Case Against CJI Ranjan Gogoi

"Today these are the rights of a working woman, but they set a precedent for the decimation of fundamental rights of all citizens and not just those who are already disadvantaged."

How to Believe Women

Women are speaking out to reclaim their experiences, so far understood only through the language of patriarchy.

Needed: A 'Tehelkaa' in Tehelka

Amongst other things, the Tarun Tejpal imbroglio highlights the incompetence or unwillingness of organisations to deal with sexual harassment cases at workplace in the letter and spirit of the Vishaka guidelines. However, the committees set up according to these guidelines should not always be conceptualised as a redressal mechanism that is “alternative” to the law.
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