ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Rural EmploymentSubscribe to Rural Employment

Unlocking Fortune at the Bottom of India’s Gobar Pyramid

A 2014 International Labour Organization study claimed that India can create millions of rural jobs by raising the value of gobar (manure) from the present `0.15–`0.30 per kg wet weight to `1.50–`2.00 per kg. This would benefit millions of landless and marginal dairy farmers who make a meagre income from gobar. Biogas technology is the answer, but its reach in rural India is insignificant. India’s biogas programme needs to make a quantum leap through initiatives that pilot new business models for village-scale plants with the support of dairy cooperatives. It needs to maximise the energy as well as nutrient value that can be derived from gobar, overcome farmers’ loss aversion by monetising benefits and costs, and incentivise the installation of biogas plants and optimise their operating performance.

Rural Employment and Poverty

This paper discusses the likely scenarios regarding employment and income growth in agriculture and non-agriculture in rural and urban areas under various assumptions about sectoral growth rates and employment elasticities. It is evident that India faces a problem in generating enough employment in the years ahead to keep pace with the growth in the labour force as also in raising wages and productivity of workers. Against this backdrop the authors consider possible strategies for increasing employment significantly reducing rural and urban poverty by 2020.

Agriculture, Employment and Social Sector Neglected

The 2003-04 Budget fails to address the major problems of agriculture, employment generation and the social sector.

Post-Reform Setbacks in Rural Employment

This paper looks at the pace and pattern of employment growth in the 1990s (post-reforms period) and compares it with the 1980s (pre-reforms period), based on NSS data, and attempts to figure out the challenges and threats that lie ahead for rural workers in India. The empirical evidence calls into question the optimism of pro-reform analysts on the all-round positive impact of economic reform on employment. The study also raises a number of questions that need further analysis to enable us to understand better the continuing and likely impact of the economic reforms.

Bold Initiatives Needed on Agriculture and Rural Employment

The specific proposals of Budget 2002-03 for agriculture and rural development do not live up to expectations. There is need for bold initiatives on public investment, credit and creating incentives for private investment to revive agricultural growth and expansion of rural employment.

Agricultural Growth, Employment and Poverty

Interdependencies in the food and labour markets are important for the development process. A strategy combining promotion of agricultural growth, productive non-farm employment and high levels of social development would be needed for labour-intensive growth in rural areas. There should also be substantial investment in human resource development for enhancing people's inherent earning capacity. The aim thus would be the generation of self-reliant employment.
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