ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Calm before the Storm?

It is generally believed that India is doing far better than most emerging market economies in these times of global economic turmoil. Emerging markets are facing capital flight, with large-scale outflows, especially since the second half of 2015, with the trend expected to continue in 2016. India has been less affected than others, but is clearly vulnerable due to the large number of Indian firms that are exposed to external borrowings, a weak rupee, a year or more of declining merchandise exports, falling corporate profitability, and stressed corporate balance sheets.

Financial Reforms in an Endogenous Money Economy

An examination of the Reserve Bank of India's monetary policy leaves little doubt that India can be suitably characterised as an endogenous money economy. In an endogenous money environment, financial reforms will prove ineffective in stimulating credit supply to large commercial borrowers. They may, however, prove counterproductive by sharpening the credit constraints faced by agricultural and other petty producers in the economy.

Changed Profile of Money Market

The Reserve Bank's two-pronged approach of allowing market players freedom to operate on the basis of market signals while threatening stern measures against excessive arbitraging between markets has achieved a profound transformation of the profile of the money market.

Central Banking and Public Policy-Making

Lectures on Economic and Financial Sector Reforms in India by Y V Reddy; Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2002, pp 236, Rs 550.

Evolving Monetary Policy in India

This paper reviews the process of monetary policy formulation, with some stylised facts monetary policy currently pursued. Issues concerning the objectives and conduct with reference to targets and the indicators are discussed. Some possible areas where future research on monetary policy could be focused are also suggested.

Modest Ambitions

The mid-term review of the monetary and credit policy for the current year springs no major surprises. It has, in the main, lowered the Bank rate by 50 basis points to 6.5 per cent and proposes to bring down, over the next two months, the cash reserve ratio to 5.5 per cent from the current effective rate (taking into account various exemptions and variable reserve ratios for particular segments of liabilities) of 6.3 per cent for the banking system as a whole. It has made further refinements of the various processes of strengthening prudential regulation of the banking system. More pertinently, it serves to highlight the constraints within which monetary policy operates in India, even going to the extent of drawing explicit reference to some of the structural impediments arising from government policy.

Realistic Interest Rates Structure

Considering the need for stimulating domestic savings through a strengthened system of banks and other financial institutions, the present structure of bank deposit and lending rates is generally realistic. The average cost of capital cannot be reduced further without hurting the development process.

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