ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

RealismSubscribe to Realism

The Last and the First

Aravind Adiga's novel The White Tiger has been criticised for its lack of realism and the caricature of its characters. The novel breaks with realist traditions of representing poverty and backwardness in Indian anglophone literature. Instead it poses a challenge to progressive traditions by framing the main character's revolt in Fanonian terms which challenges both the tradition of leftist movement politics as well as the liberal discourse of rights and privileges. Drawing from the same sources of anger and angst as much of realist literature, Adiga fashions a new voice which is unfamiliar and unsettling in its revolt.

Dialectics on Power

Gautam Sen’s ‘Opinion’ piece, ‘Indian foreign policy: a power political interpretation’ (EPW, January 13-19) is anchored in the ‘realist’ imaginary of canonical International Relations – ‘power, security, survival and dominance’. But his sinister architecture of the regional and global political spaces threateningly encircling a nuclear Indian, which lamentably self wills its external enfeeblement and dependence, rests on a own curious even violent yoking of disparate developments, half truths and outright fictions, innuendoes and sweeping judgments.

Solipsism or Solidarity

Among postcolonial novels, Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children and Pramoedya's Buru quartet bear a clear resemblance, for both are responses to the degeneration seen in postcolonial societies. This article, a comparative study of the two novels, seeks to understand the value of the realistic historical novel; the individual's relation to the national community; the reasons for the degeneration of postcolonial societies and the significance of exile.
Back to Top