ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Rabindranath TagoreSubscribe to Rabindranath Tagore

Looking Beyond the Postcolonial Reading of Rabindranath Tagore’s Works

The postcolonial discourse in India has attempted to appropriate Tagore within its fold. But he cannot be appropriated by a single discourse, let alone by postcolonialism. His works, when keenly examined, transcend postcolonial thinking. The re-examination of Tagore’s views and ideas, on the other hand, hold immense value for the current political discourse of nationalism and democracy in India.

Education for the Species

Respectable scientific opinion holds that the human species is on the verge of untimely extinction. According to Noam Chomsky, the so-called "least advanced" people are the ones taking the lead in trying to protect all of us from extinction. Informed by their ancient knowledge systems, indigenous populations across the world are resisting the plunder of the planet. However, indigenous knowledge systems are in radical conflict not only with global capitalism but with modern education itself, thus raising the issue of radical choice. The issue goes much beyond the classical domain of the pedagogy of the oppressed.

University and the Nation

If nationalist sentiments are the only and final prerogative to belong to an academic community, then it must also be reiterated, a university has no business to share these sentiments. The founding figures of JNU knew it and it is upon the entire community of students, teachers and concerned citizens to safeguard the university against such jingoistic versions of nationalism.

Transactions among Colonials

Transactions among Colonials Empire, the National, and the Postcolonial, 1890-1920: Resistance in Interaction by Elleke Boehmer; Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2002; pp 239 with index, price not mentioned.

The Nation Betrayed

While agreeing in substance with Ramachandra Guha's critique of expatriate Indian intellectuals, that commentary is extended here to (a) point to an important impediment in their intellectual project coming in the way of their taking their migrant status seriously and hence interrogating their milieu with greater rigour; and (b) reply to grounded patriots that there are other legitimate albeit unstable locations from which to construct a social science. Turning to Guhaâ??s peculiar smugness about 'relevance', it is argued that in talking of discourse and deployment of power within intellectual communities, the nation may not be the only legitimate category of analysis.

Imagined Women

Women’s Images, Men’s Imagination: Female Characters in Bengali Fiction in Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century by Banani Mukhia; Manohar, New Delhi, 2002; pp 167, Rs 325
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