ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Learning and Language

In low-cost private schools in India, English as a medium of instruction attracts children of poorly educated parents with a low-income background. A primary survey in Delhi and the National Capital Region finds that mediating primary-level education through an unfamiliar language poses language barriers and adversely affects the learning outcome. The agency in using English for communication is limited. The learning deficit is undetected through successive grades in the primary level due to translation- and memorisation-based teaching processes, and focus on textbook-based exercises. The study finds that parents do not get a fair exchange in return for committing their limited resources towards education.

Education Guarantee Scheme and Primary Schooling in Madhya Pradesh

This paper presents the results of a field study of public schools in Betul and Dewas districts of Madhya Pradesh. The study aims to document the functioning of public schools, whether created by the Education Guarantee Scheme or not and to understand the consequences of the reforms on the links between education and rural society and on the development of private schools. While the results may not be representative of all of rural Madhya Pradesh, they provide an accurate picture of the situation in two areas atypical of the settings targeted by EGS, viz, adivasi villages and dalit hamlets.

Government and Private Schools

This paper examines disparities across government and private schools in two cities of Uttar Pradesh - Firozabad and Deoria. The study considered varied parameters - enrolment rates, retention rates, gender differentials - in an attempt to estimate out-of-school children in these districts. While the proportion of students in private schools has been consistently rising, the study found that government schools still score over private ones in several aspects, for instance attendance rates and issues of gender sensitivity.
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