ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Primary EducationSubscribe to Primary Education

Deteriorating Primary Education

The Maharashtra government's decision to institute a new public examination at the end of the fourth year of primary education, which will be compulsory for students of all government-aided schools, cannot be expected to make any difference to the admittedly deplorable standards of primary education in the state when the government has no plans to meet the woeful shortages of trained teachers and essential school facilities.

Government and Private Schools

This paper examines disparities across government and private schools in two cities of Uttar Pradesh - Firozabad and Deoria. The study considered varied parameters - enrolment rates, retention rates, gender differentials - in an attempt to estimate out-of-school children in these districts. While the proportion of students in private schools has been consistently rising, the study found that government schools still score over private ones in several aspects, for instance attendance rates and issues of gender sensitivity.

The New Segregation

This article, based on a desk review of the District Primary Education Programme (DPEP) and qualitative micro studies in six states - Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Andhra Pradesh, Haryana and Tamil Nadu - attempts to capture the impact of primary education programmes on the ground. Introducing the emergent concept of 'hierarchies of access' to describe the new segregation occurring in primary education, the article focuses on the micro studies documenting the tangible and intangible dimensions of gender and social equity that frame the implementation of DPEP at the village and panchayat level. On the basis of the findings of the desk review and the micro studies, the authors discuss ways to reverse the trend of segregation so as to make universal primary education a substantive reality.

Primary Education : New Labels for Old

Teachers in Orissa’s Non-Formal Education (NFE) Programme are faced with the threat of losing their jobs. These teachers, numbering about 40,000, have been working on a meagre salary of Rs 200 per month since 1996, many of them in remote, inaccessible districts of the state. To draw attention to their plight, early this month seven of the teachers went so far as to set themselves on fire outside the residence of the speaker of the state assembly in Bhubaneswar.

DPEP and Primary Education

issue? In addition, can the issue of para teachers be reduced to the crisis of DPEP and Primary Education regularisation of para teachers in govern- ROOPA JOSHI This note is not to be construed as a rejoinder to

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