ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Population growthSubscribe to Population growth

Demographic Dynamism of Punjab, 1971–2011

Three aspects of population—vital rates, population growth, and population composition—have played a key role in the demographic dynamism of Punjab since 1971. Population mobility shows a distinct pattern: outmigration and emigration from the state, and a simultaneous inflow of labour, chiefly from Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, leading to notable rise in Scheduled Caste population, and also a moderate increase in the share of Hindu and Muslim population.

Two-Child Norm and Panchayats

The Haryana legislation, now upheld by the Supreme Court debarring those with more than two children from contesting panchayat elections, is a serious misreading of the relationship between population and resources and an egregious assault on the process of democratisation. The law selectively affects socially and economically deprived groups, given that it is they who register higher fertility rates.

India's Family Planning Programme: An Unpleasant Essay

This paper takes a fresh critical look at the evolution of India's family planning programme (FPP) and at its performance and failings. It addresses India's apparently contradictory position of having a pioneering role in the global population control movement and also being branded as a country of 'demographic inertia'. This puzzle is in large part due to a deep contradiction and confusion that has continued from the very beginning to inflict the policy-makers and political leadership, especially about the potential of FPP per se in reducing fertility. A tension between the felt urgency of population control and a stubborn scepticism about the effectiveness of a voluntary FPP in the context of a slow socio-economic transformation, has fed into further confusions and chaos relating to the choice of policy instruments and programme strategy. This is brought into sharper focus by the success story of Bangladesh's family planning programme. The most prominent deficiencies and mistakes of India's family planning programme are, it is argued, related largely to a typical bureaucratic (and perhaps political too) predilections, hazy perceptions about effective strategy, and relatedly a chronic mismatch between expressions of priority and actual fund allocation to FPP, which were confounded by a distinct lack of openness (until very recently) towards the experience and expertise of the international community.

Behind the Population Numbers

This last decade India has seen the sharpest decline in the population growth rate since independence. Although in absolute numbers, we have added 181 million people, the decline in growth rate is heartening. It is tempting to view the products of the mammoth Census 2001 exercise as the key to the numbers game. While numbers are certainly important, the Census figures, even these preliminary data, should be read as a comprehensive comment on decadal socioeconomic development.
Back to Top