ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Dynamics of Land Acquisition

The Supreme Court’s judgment on 31 August 2016 to return the acquired land to farmers with compensation in Singur, West Bengal brought euphoria to the displaced farmers in Barnala district, Punjab. Since no project has been initiated on the acquired land in Barnala after 10 years, land acquisition should be cancelled by the Supreme Court taking suo motu cognisance. This article highlights how, in a high-handed manner, farmers’ land was grabbed by the politico-corporate lobby under the guise of land acquisition.

The Convergence of Peasant Struggles Worldwide

A plethora of problems face Southern and Northern family agricultures in the current neo-liberal era of financial capital domination worldwide, and has paved the way for the revival of peasant struggles for their social emancipation and legitimate right of access to land and food. Obviously, such struggles also concern all categories of workers and people because what is at stake is the challenge to reach food sovereignty and to build our societies at the local, national and global levels, on the principles of social justice, equality and real democracy.

Tebhaga–Telangana to Naxalbari–CPI(ML)

Even as the Naxalbari uprising was quickly crushed, the revolutionary communists painstakingly spread the movement and founded the All India Coordination Committee of Communist Revolutionaries and the Communist Party of India (Marxist–Leninist). Naxalbari differed from the Telangana uprising, which did not spread to other provinces and left no immediate trail after the setback mainly because no all-India party was built for the purpose. The movement–party dialectic is explored to better understand the radical communist movement in India.

The Peasant Question from Marx to Lenin

What is a class? Do peasants constitute a single class? What is the peasant question from the Marxists' revolutionary perspective? These issues are raised in this paper, based on the writings of Marx, Engels and Lenin, above all. The empirical part, mainly on the Russian agrarian scene from the 1890s to 1930, explores if the peasants constituted a cohesive social force free from internal contradictions. There is also a brief discussion on the post-Soviet situation.
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