ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

PatriarchySubscribe to Patriarchy

Waste Pickers and the ‘Right to Waste’ in an Indian City

Waste belongs to households and then to the municipality once it enters the public collection/disposal system. What does this mean for informal waste pickers? Despite their numbers and importance, they lack a “right to waste” and are vulnerable to processes of accumulation. This paper presents the counter-narrative of Solid Waste Collection and Handling, India’s first wholly self-owned cooperative of waste pickers, which has been contracted by the Pune Municipal Corporation for door-to-door waste collection. The initiative legitimises a “right to waste” for waste pickers by allowing them direct access to waste from households, and has reconceptualised waste and work for waste pickers, while altering their engagement with other stakeholders.

How to Believe Women

Women are speaking out to reclaim their experiences, so far understood only through the language of patriarchy.

Kissing in Protest

Over the last few days a lot has been done, said and written on the “Kiss of Love” protests, but perhaps we have forgotten that the primary intention of the protests is not to kiss in public, but to claim one’s right to the freedom of expression . The real issue is a protest against moral policing...

Loving and Living in 21st Century India

Honour killings are rampant in many parts of India, particularly in its north and northwest states. An account of a young couple who managed to escape and marry but are still being hunted and thus, hiding.

Three-Dimensional Family

Empirical research on the family has largely concentrated on kinship patterns, modes of household organisation, patterns of inheritance, and practices of nurturance. Contemporary social movements, on the other hand, have underscored the subservience of nurturance to the hierarchies of gender in family households in India. In this complex location of the family, this article seeks to map a three-dimensional view that cuts across discourses and disciplines and underscores a multilayered practice of sociology in order to evolve a more nuanced understanding of the family.

History of Women's Rights: A Non-Historicist Reading

This essay revisits the history of the rhetoric of women's agency and rights in colonial and postcolonial India in which debates around liberalism were often played out by mobilising the language of self-sacrifice to oppose the language of self-interest. The focus is on the debates around the Hindu Code Bill, 1955-56 which gave Hindu women the right to inherit paternal property and to institute divorce proceedings.

Breaking the Spell of Dharma

This paper makes a fresh case for the renewal of an Enlightenment-style critique of the dharmic understanding of nature and society in India. Challenging the postmodernist and postcolonial critics who reduce the Euro-American Enlightenment to discourses of western imperialism and patriarchy, the author seeks to recover the critical impulse behind it and attempts to find cultural homologues for an Enlightenment-style 'revolt against superstition' in Indian society. By analysing how Hindu dharma naturalises hierarchy and patriarchy, the paper argues for the need for a scientific demystification of the order of nature. Without a critical engagement with the content of Hinduism's sacred tenets, it is argued here, secularisation of consciousness and culture cannot succeed.

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