ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles By Pakistan

The Making of an Economic Crisis in Pakistan

In order to break away from the neo-liberal debt servitude, Pakistan needs a strong political will to make structural changes to its political economy. Policies centred on working people and their needs should be privileged over the International Monetary Fund’s one-size-fits-all (non)-solution that it con­tinues to advocate in developing coun­tries.

A Failed Economy Saved by Geography

Despite experiencing multiple political and economic crises in recent times, Pakistan’s economy has so far avoided a collapse similar to Sri Lanka’s. It is argued that the key to understanding its economic survival has been the effective utilisation of its unique geography, thereby exhibiting features of a rentier state. Its strategic location has enabled Pakistan to secure military and economic support from three major countries, namely the United States, China, and Saudi Arabia. While this enabled a razor’s edge type unstable economic survival, it also prevented the country from undertaking significant political and economic reforms. 

Pakistan in the Aftermath of Floods

As Pakistan’s worst affected recover from the recent floods, the province of Sindh and Balochistan will need serious reparatory action from both local and international actors. International actors continue to profit from the extractions and lending enterprises, while locally, the most climate vulnerable are systematically excluded from dialogue and process for development projects that impact their rights to housing and livelihood and protect them from climate change.

End of the Postcolonial State

Much of the scholarship on Bangladesh’s founding places it within a narrative of repetition. It either repeats the partitions of 1905 or 1947 or the creation of India and Pakistan as postcolonial states. This paper argues instead for the novelty of Bangladesh’s creation against the postcolonial state, suggesting that it opened up a new history at the global level in which decolonisation was replaced by civil war as the founding narrative for new states.