ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Underscoring the Perils of Majoritarianism

Our Hindu Rashtra: What It Is. How We Got Here by Aakar Patel, Westland Books, 2020; pp 368, ₹ 799.

Lessons of Hope for India and Pakistan

Animosity at Bay: An Alternative History of the India–Pakistan Relationship, 1947–52 by Pallavi Raghavan, HarperCollins Publishers India, 2020, pp 288, ₹ 699.

India’s Afghan Policy: Challenges and Anxieties

India can only wait patiently and watch the situation in Afghanistan before initiating any action.

Afghanistan: Present Tense, Future Imperfect

The Taliban takeover cannot be understood outside the hegemonic economic and geopolitical interests.

A Bridge of Transition to the Postcolonial

India in the Interregnum: Interim Government September 1946–August 1947 by Rakesh Ankit, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2019; pp xii + 376, ₹ 1,195.

Tribal Revolts in a Precarious Frontier

The Limits of Empire: Sub-imperialism and Pukhtun Resistance in the North-West Frontier edited by Sameetah Agha, Hyderabad: Orient Blackswan Private Limited, 2020; pp xvii + 231, price not indicated.

Wit, Irreverence, and a Mirror

Legendary comedians Jaspal Bhatti and Moin Akhter on either side of the India–Pakistan border showed the mirror to their hypocritical governments and societies, but with hearty laughs.

Jazba, Restraint and Political Action: New Dimensions of Islamic Politics in Pakistan

Charting out the new dimension of politics in Pakistan, Iqbal Singh Sevea describes the rise of the new political party, Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan, with its leader, Khadim Hussain Rizvi, openly supportive of a fundamentalist form of Islam. He encouraged supporters to organise protests against blasphemous acts. On the other hand, Islamic intellectuals such as Javed Ahmad Ghamidi preach a more liberal form of Islam. With the recent death of Rizvi, it remains to be seen in which direction politics in Pakistan will move.

Infrastructural Ephemera and Public Health in Pakistan

“Infrastructural ephemera” as a set of spontaneous affective relations critical to the success of large-scale projects of urban governance in the urban South are examined. The deep contradictions underscoring the labours of women employed as community health workers in Lyari Town, Karachi, at a time of intense gang violence, are explored. Drawing on two years of field research as a polio vaccinator in Lyari, the reach (and limits) of daptability, skills, and labour (physical, mental, and emotional) involved in the maintenance and repair of a fragile public health infrastructure are explored. Maintaining “community health” also involves dealing mortal and aspirational death to those that provide infrastructural labour to the project of giving life.

Eschewing and (Not) Manipulating Escalation

India’s unwillingness to tactically manipulate escalation makes its responses predictable and has led to strategic inertia most evident in the handling of the situation at the Line of Actual Control in Ladakh. The responsibility for this inertia primarily lies with the political leadership, but the...

Research Radio Ep 7: Who is Afraid of Pakistan’s Aurat March?

In this episode, we speak to Afiya Shehrbano Zia about Pakistan's Aurat March and debates between secular and right-wing women's groups.

Coke Studio Pakistan: An Ode to Eastern Music with a Western Touch

Since it was first aired in 2008, Coke Studio Pakistan has emerged as an unprecedented musical movement in South Asia. It has revitalised traditional and Eastern classical music of South Asia by incorporating contemporary Western music instrumentation and new-age production elements.

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