ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Identity, Indigeneity and the National

In the Name of the Nation: India and Its Northeast by Sanjib Baruah, New Delhi: Navayana Publishing (by arrangement with Stanford Univ Press), 2021; pp xiii + 278, ` 599.

Assam Evictions: A Travesty of Justice and Human Rights

Systemic discrimination and prejudice against a community has led to dehumanising violence.

Assam and the NRC

Deepankar Basu and Debarshi Das, in their article “Assam’s Politics and the NRC” (EPW, 1 February 2020), have raised a few critical issues regarding the fundamental flaws in the National Register of Citizens (NRC) updating process in Assam and emphasised building an alternative narrative. Their...

Discussion: 'Linking Excesses in NRC Process to Assamese Xenophobia Is Unwarranted'

The false narrative of Assamese "xenophobia" stinks, and today, except the Hindutva camp, no mainstream Assamese organisation propagates racist or communal agenda in the state.

Whose Protest is Legitimate? A Reading List

The place that protests have in society is determined by the legitimacy with which they are seen.

An Epistemic Change?

It was the Central Legislative Assembly of British India that first enacted the Foreigners Act, 1946, giving the government the powers to deal with “foreigners” in India. The enigmatic definition of the term “foreigner” in it was “one who is not Indian.” In December 1955, Parliament enacted the...

The Citizen Finds a Home

On a fact-finding trip to the Karbi Anglong district of Assam, the authors find that the “crisis of citizenship” is a structural phenomenon rooted in the history of capitalist development and community dynamics in the state. The current political dispensation of establishing the “Hindu” Bengali as the “citizen” is not only a breach of the universal principles of “citizenship,” but also has deeper implications for the unresolved ethnic conflicts in the state.

Revisiting the Nationality Question in Assam

A series of articles published in the Economic & Political Weekly during the 1980s’ Assam Movement—when the nationality debate was at its zenith—offer a context against which the issue can be revisited.
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