ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Capitalising Nature

While producing “cheap” nature, capitalism produces climate change that challenges the entire process of capitalising nature. The system responds by creating “solutions” such as climate-smart agriculture, allowing for enhanced capitalist enclosure of smallholder farmers by big agricultural...

Revisiting the Debates on Man-Nature Relation in Marxist Tradition

This paper tried to locate the debate on man-nature relation in the Marxist tradition. It looks at Marx’s theory of alienation and dialectics and argues that his theory of alienation and dialectics is not limited to a critique of capitalist modernity but shows man’s alienation from nature. Developing on this thesis, this paper looks at Engel’s position on the place of nature in Marxism. We argue that Engels’s notion of ecological crisis in capitalism is a result of his idea of nature as above society as he argued in Dialectics of Nature. In Lukacs and western Marxism, Engel’s thesis of the dialectics of nature is criticised. We especially highlight how Engels’s notion of nature suffers the reification of capitalism.

Marxist Ecology in the light of Contemporary Ecological Thought: Reflections on the Ontological Questions in Dark, Deep and Marxist Ecology

The paper strives to explore some fundamental debates concerning the question of ecology, nature and culture in Marxian corpus. First, it attempts to explicate the differences and commonalities between the philosophical conception of nature in Marxism and contemporary and old ecological thoughts like Dark ecology of Timothy Morton and Deep ecology of Arne Naess. Second, the paper is also an attempt to revisit some of the larger philosophical and ontological questions pertaining to nature and ecology; especially the questions related to ontological position of mind and matter in relation to nature and how these fundamental questions have a bearing on the current and future trajectory of ecological thought and movements globally in the Anthropocene epoch.

The Need to Overhaul Wasteland Classification Systems in India

The term “wastelands” originates from land governance systems in the colonial period, and it has been criticised in academia and conservation for being ecologically flawed. Although wastelands have been redefined in the post-independence period, there has been little change in the assumption that they were unproductive, degraded, and in need of external intervention for improvement. The eradication of the term “waste” and a thorough revision of the wastelands atlas, which can then meaningfully address national and global targets of sustainable development, are argued for here. This article weaves together historical contexts around wastelands and proposes a new approach for their mapping.

On a Cup of Tea and a Coconut Tree

Do we shrug off the existential heartburn on seeing a tree being axed, blaming it on the inevitable progression of things?

The Multiple Meanings of Nature Conservation

With increasing concerns about the degradation of forests threatening the existence of wildlife, conservation projects are seen as the need of the hour. However, conservation as a concept is often understood differently by the local community, the scientific community, and the state. A critical examination of the ongoing efforts for tiger conservation in Dibang Valley, Arunachal Pradesh, exposes the fault lines in the narrative of nature conservation as the state imposes its agenda through the establishment of sanctuaries and reserves, without considering the needs of the local Mishmi tribe and excluding their traditional conservation practices.

Ecological Memory

Along with our birds and natural landscapes, our ecological consciousness is slowly disappearing.

Today's Environmentalism

Environmental activism in India comprises two streams. The first focuses on protected areas and relies on the bureaucracy that often misuses its powers against communities that live in close contact with nature. The second focuses on protecting nature to safeguard people's livelihoods and health. The environmental agenda should focus on the reassertion of people's rights over natural resources, and this should be coupled with an action-oriented promotion of nature-friendly cooperative enterprises in sectors like quarrying, and mineral and sand mining.

Stories We Tell

One of the central methodological insights of feminist science studies has been refuting the binary worlds of nature and culture. Over the last three decades, feminist science studies has developed a vibrant epistemological, and methodological apparatus for studying the natural world as a naturecultural world. Bringing together (inter)disciplinary methodologies, philosophies, practices, assumptions, methods and languages of women's studies and the natural sciences, we see the emergence of new modes of knowledge production. This paper explores the epistemological challenges of studying gender in the natural and physical sciences and the methodological tools the field has developed to study the human and non-human, life and non-life.

The Eastern Himalaya

The eastern Himalayan region has been blessed by rich natural resources - forests, wildlife as well as its people, who are a fount of information of traditional healing systems and beliefs. However, the region has for long suffered from indifference and from insurgency, which has in recent years, become endemic to the region. A healing process could rightly begin, with the government's initiation, and supported by NGOs and the local communities.
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