ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Muslims as Secular Interlocutors

I n recent months, more so during the pandemic that we were all trying to contain and overcome, there has, inter alia, been a growing and alarming theme in the media that can be described in phrases familiar to the free-world like fake news, Islamophobia, sectarianism, fascism, and closer home as...

Deconstructing Muslim Identity

Making a Muslim: Reading Publics and Contesting Identities in Nineteenth Century North India by S Akbar Zaidi, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021; pp 269, `950 (hardback).

Prisoners of Conscience

A Twelve-Year Night is a compelling piece of art about the undying spirit of resistance in the face of authoritarian regimes.

Assam Evictions: A Travesty of Justice and Human Rights

Systemic discrimination and prejudice against a community has led to dehumanising violence.

Judas and the Black Messiah

Based on a Hollywood film about a member of the Black Panther Party, the author explores the history of deep-rooted racism in law enforcement and the structural and institutional continuities that persist.

Analysing Socio-economic Backwardness among Muslims

Backward and Dalit Muslims: Education, Employment and Poverty by Surinder Kumar, Fahimuddin, Prashant K Trivedi and Srinivas Goli, Jaipur: Rawat Publications, 2020; pp 220, ₹995.

Listening to Muslim Women

Muslim Women Speak: Of Dreams and Shackles by Ghazala Jamil, New Delhi, California, London and Singapore: Sage Publications and New Delhi: Yoda Press, 2018; pp xxiv + 190, ₹ 595.

Civilisation Mongering and Right-wing Culturalism

Hindu–Muslim Relations: What Europe Might Learn from India by Jörg Friedrichs, Routledge India, 2018; pp 152, ₹ 695 (hardcover).

Understanding Citizenship and Refugees’ Status in India

The recent Rohingya crisis in South Asia raised questions regarding the refugee policies of the Indian state, which seem to take a very diplomatic position on the refugee problem. This article seeks to argue that India’s kindness for some refugee communities and ignorant behaviour for Muslim refugees has raised a doubt on its way of refugee dealings, and has posed question on the very secular face of the Indian state. How the Supreme Court as well as the Indian government has viewed and handled the refugee problem has been discussed in detail in this article.

Complicating the Feminist

Margaret Sanger’s feminism blurs the lines between the East and the West. It carries continuities and a resemblance to strands of feminism understood and promoted by contemporary liberal India and their dominant positioning vis-à-vis marginalised groups, such as Dalits, Muslims and the urban and rural poor.

From Jobless to Job-loss Growth

The unprecedented decline in the absolute number of workers in the Indian economy in recent times has been a subject of debate and a matter of public concern. A closer look at the data for the period 2011–12 and 2017–18 shows that it is the net result of a dynamic process of job creation and destruction. Those who have lost jobs are all with low education, that is, less than secondary level of education. From a gender perspective, rural women workers are the net losers. From a social point of view, the net losers belong to two groups: Muslims and Hindu Other Backward Classes. These are clear signs of rural India in distress with strong gender and social dimensions.

Muslims, Affirmative Action and Secularism

Religion-based preferential treatment in the services of the state is generally argued to be in contradiction with secularism. As a result, the Indian state has relied on a non-preference, non-discrimination framework to address the issues of backwardness and under-representation of Muslims. This article attempts to partially reconcile the contradiction between religion-based preferential treatment and secularism, and it is argued that the determination of welfare policies for religious minorities, particularly Muslims within the non-preference, non-determination framework, either has to be justified in the public philosophy of the state or social justice has to be given a relative preference to secularism, especially when the policies formulated within the non-preference, non-discrimination framework have not proven to be effective in targeting the relative backwardness of Muslims.

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