ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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DCR33

In 2018, almost 10 years after the process was initiated in 2009, the development plan of Mumbai was sanctioned. The first draft of the plan, which sought to significantly reform urban planning in Mumbai, was scrapped in 2015. However, contrary to the widespread assumption that the first draft was rejected due to public opposition, this paper argues that a key factor behind the scrapping was to reform one of the central regulations of the 1991 Development Plan of Mumbai, Regulation 33, which provides development rights incentives and planning relaxations to property developers in Mumbai. Through an analysis of Mumbai’s development plan process, this paper offers a glimpse into the divergent values and interests of powerful groups, and how these interests are coordinated and reconciled in the city. The process reveals the extent to which real-estate capital shapes urban space and common sense of urban planning in Mumbai.

Sharing in Cities, and Stacked Streets

How should we distribute land areas between amenities— schools, hospitals, parks—and private plots for homes and jobs? What is the ideal proportion for each? We need to do this for two different situations, greenfield sites and brownfield sites. In greenfield sites, where we start with vacant land, we have considerable freedom to choose our proportions, and the ideal we have selected will be a very useful guide for new area planning. Even for brownfield sites, a notion of what would be ideal proportions for land distribution between amenities and buildable plots would be a useful guide. The article attempts to extract guiding principles and concludes with a detailed study of the redevelopment of BDD Chawls at Worli, Mumbai.

Fishing Commons and Survival in Capitalist Mumbai

Set Adrift: Capitalist Transformations and Community Politics along Mumbai’s Shore by Gayatri Nair, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2021; pp 202, `1,295 (hardbound).

Policy Change and Floor Space Index

This article explores the key features of contemporary floor space index policy in Mumbai to contribute to the ongoing debates and provide the context for evaluating the proposed urban policy changes. Contemporary FSI in Mumbai exists in a policy network of exemptions, incentives, and development rights.

The Making of the City of Capital

Making the Modern Slum: The Power of Capital in Colonial Bombay by Sheetal Chhabria, Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2019; pp 235, $30 (paperback).

Bombay Hustle: Making Movies in a Colonial City by Debashree Mukherjee, New York: Columbia University Press, 2020; pp 420, $30 (paperback).

(Un)truth Technologies to Subvert Justice

The Truth Machines: Policing, Violence, and Scientific Interrogations in India by Jinee Lokaneeta, Orient BlackSwan, 2020; pp xiii + 250, price not indicated. 

Misogyny and Bar Ban

Bans and Bar Girls: Performing Caste in Mumbai’s Dance Bars by Sameena Dalwai, published by Women Unlimited (an associate of Kali for Women), New Delhi, 2019; pp 242, `595 (hardcover).

Hindustani Music in Mumbai

Musicophilia in Mumbai: Performing Subjects and the Metropolitan Unconscious by Tejaswini Niranjana, New Delhi: Tulika Books, 2020; pp xii + 225, ` 695.

 

Extreme Flooding Events and Land Cover Change

Land use change through developmental activities and deforestation is widely regarded as the primary driver of extreme flood events. This perception is typical of a reading of disasters influenced by environmentalism.

Bombay as Archive and Muse

Bombay Before Mumbai: Essays in Honour of Jim Masselos edited by Prashant Kidambi, Manjiri Kamat and Rachel Dwyer, Penguin Random House India, 2019; pp 428, 999 (hardbound).

 

Understanding Housing Resettlement through Women’s Experiences

A Place to Call Home: Women as Agents of Change in Mumbai by Ramya Ramanath, New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 2019; pp xvii + 170, `795.

 

Political Economy of Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation Budgets

The paper focuses on the changing trends in budget allocations of the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation, especially since the structural adjustment programme that came to be implemented from 1990 and how it has affected civic services, especially health and education. The paper concludes that it has increasingly directed public resources to the private sector and reduced access adversely access to both healthcare and school education for Mumbaikars.

 

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