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Kamala Mills Fire and the Perilous Gentrification of Mumbai

Looking at the larger history of deindustrialisation, gentrification, and change in patterns of land use in what was known as Mumbai’s Girangaon area, the article seeks to explain the recent tragic fire accident in the Kamala Mills compound as an example of the multiple risks in a chaotic and perilous landscape.

Revanchism in Mumbai? Political Economy of Rent Gaps and Urban Restructuring in a Global City

The political economy of rent gaps emerging from the "highest and best use" of land in Mumbai has led to a spatial restructuring of the city. Manufacturing units are increasingly relocated to the suburbs and the working classes and the poor cleansed from the high-end business and financial districts as the state is increasingly subordinate to the economy in the liberalisation era.

Recycling Mill Land

From the perspective of Mumbai's economy, the controversy over developing land of the closed textile mills is linked to the decline of manufacturing and the rise of services. This has pushed skilled labour into the informal sector resulting in the dramatic reduction of their income, which has also pushed them into informal housing. How should a city cope with such a process in terms of the impact on the economy, employment, land use and environment?

Redevelopment of Mumbai s Cotton Textile Mill Land-Opportunity Lost

The decline of textile industry heralds the de-industrialisation of Mumbai, manifested in the exodus of workers from the city's mill areas. The mill-owners in order to earn bigger revenue are resorting to subterfuge in disposing of their land, workers and assets under the pretext of 'modernising' their mills. None of the agencies involved, from central government to state government institutions and the municipal authorities, appears to be unduly concerned about this major change in industrial heartland of Mumbai In order to retain the social heritage of Girangaon, and most importantly, to retain as many jobs as possible, the state government instead of permitting piecemeal, haphazard growth through clandestine plot-by-plot sale of mill land, should actively intervene to bring together lands belonging to different mills in a particular area, so that they can be put to best possible socially relevant use.

Mumbai's Textile Mills and the Land Question

In refusing to give permission to textile mills in Mumbai to sell their land the Maharashtra government gives the impression that it is being sympathetic to the cause of the mill workers, but actually it is pandering to the builders' lobby. The take-no-decision policy of the state government does not mean, however, that changes will not take place, albeit haphazardly and clandestinely. Based on recent developments, some likely scenarios are sketched here.

Mumbai Textile Mills Land-High Cost of Inaction

The continuing indecision about the land belonging to the textile mills in Mumbai has hurt the dry, poor and rich alike. In a city starved of land for housing, commerce and recreation, the bringing of 300 to 400 acres of centrally-located land on the market cannot but have a desirable impact, particularly if a large chunk of the new land were to be earmarked for low income housing at high density.
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