ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Eschewing and (Not) Manipulating Escalation

India’s unwillingness to tactically manipulate escalation makes its responses predictable and has led to strategic inertia most evident in the handling of the situation at the Line of Actual Control in Ladakh. The responsibility for this inertia primarily lies with the political leadership, but the...

Why India Did Not Go to War with China

India had the military ability to evict the intrusions in Ladakh or carry out a quick grab action of its own in the early stages of the crisis. Yet, it did not exercise the offensive military options. The explanation for such strategic reticence lies at the political level.

Inception of Aviation Routes between India and China

Chinese National Aviation Corporation initiated the diplomatic relations for air connectivity between China and British India in the 1930s. The proposal included extending the CNAC’s service from Chungking in South-west China with Dinjan (in upper Assam). This was the context for the development of an air route between China and India. This commercial venture (which was threatened by World War II) played an active part in the wartime operation, especially after the fall of Rangoon and the consequent capture of the Burma Road by the Japanese forces.

Region without Regionalism

Three decades have passed since the inception of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation. It still is virtually a non-starter and has not addressed any substantive issue. Intra-regional trade is minuscule. India and Pakistan show little interest in the organisation. Without judging their respective foreign policies, it is argued that South Asian regionalism is not on their agenda. Three questions arise: Is South Asia at all a region? How much does the strategic divide between India and Pakistan, with China factored in, come in the way of South Asian regionalism? Why should India bother about regionalism when its policy of bilateralism serves it fine? To probe these, the region's history, global perceptions of the region, India's foreign and educational practices, and interstate relationships are discussed.

Political Economy of US-Pakistan Relations

Hamza Alavi, in this journal, offered the most pronounced presentation of US-Pakistan relations in terms of a patron-client model. In an attempt to further the understanding, it is noted that Alavi discounted the role of the internal political economy of Pakistan. The canonical patron-client formulation is scrutinised to reformulate the role of Pakistan as an "estranged client." The attempt is to internalise the interplay of the geostrategic and political-economy interests of the Pakistani military in US-Pakistan relations.

Yoga as a Prelude to Politicisation of the Military

Drawing on the news reporting of the army's association with Ramdev's organisation for yoga training, a discussion on the potential and possibility of politicisation of the military with Hindutva philosophy.

Witness to History

Trumpets and Tumults: The Memoirs of a Peacekeeper by Major General Inderjit Rikhye; Manohar, Delhi, 2002; pp 266, Rs 500.

Black Humour in Time of War

While there is no dearth of news of the devastation caused by the ugly war in Iraq, there has been a profusion of absurdities, in the pronouncements, claims and counter-claims of the leaders and war correspondents and the editorial output of the Indian media.

Fall-out of September 11

Tighter security and police/military methods alone will rarely end terrorism, whether in the US or in Kashmir. The possible targets are too many and the methods are varied and uncontrollable. The key is avoiding situations where a section of the people gets so alienated that it starts believing that terror and violence are the only means to get 'justice', or at least attention. Political solutions are a must.

A Montage of Skulduggery

A quick look at media reports in the first weeks of the new year reveals the horrifying diversity of daily conflicts among the varieties of intra-religious, ethinic, political, linguistic, political and pseudo-political groups and parties that are tearing society apart.
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