ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Mental HealthSubscribe to Mental Health

Mental Justice of the NT-DNTs in Context of the Pandemic

Mental justice of Nomadic and Denotified Tribes (NT-DNTs) should be the most important aspect of their overall access to social justice. Mental health needs to be redefined as a justice issue, especially in the context of marginalised communities. The NT-DNTs being perhaps one of the earliest communities worldwide to be criminalised for dissenting, the ramifications have acutely affected their mental justice over the last 150 years. This has worsened during the current pandemic. The article puts forth recommendations for the mental and therefore overall justice of NT-DNTs.

Tragedy on Trial

The outcome of procedural justice involves both cost for some and benefits for others.

COVID-19: Mental Healthcare without Social Justice?

Mental health is not just about absence of mental illness. It is critical that the government takes long-term economic and mental health policy measures to ensure employment, basic amenities and public health, without which mental healthcare cannot address the debilitating effects of ongoing structural violence on a majority of citizens.

Bardo of Lockdown

As the earth seems to be resetting itself through the current global pandemic, perhaps it is a good time to be more mindful of what our “essential” needs truly are.

Mental Health in India: A Problematic Discourse Can Only Lead to Inadequate Laws

Effective legislation on mental health needs to address both the social and economic dimensions of deprivation that persons without access to mental healthcare face.

Peer Support in Mental Healthcare

“Peers” are a resource that can be tapped into to support a wide variety of people in the mental health system. These are people who have lived experiences of recovery in mental health. This kind of support offers the peers a meaningful work opportunity, financial and social empowerment, and consolidates their recoveries. It also helps those who are currently suffering by enabling them to experience a peer’s caring and supportive assistance, patient listening and helpful advice in view of the hurried and professional approaches of mental health professionals.

The Mental Health Imbroglio

The question that needs to be asked is, how many of those being treated for mental illness are recovering? Does the current treatment regimen help people with recovery, or is it only a “treatment” option with an entry and no exit point? Psychiatric professionals need to focus on recovery.

Burden of Post-partum Depression

Post-partum depression is a rising health concern in India, having an impact on the lives of both rural and urban women. Seventeen studies on PPD have been examined in order to understand the current state of knowledge of PPD, with respect to its prevalence, risk factors, effects and interventions.

How Kerala’s Poor Tribals Are Being Branded As 'Mentally Ill'

Paternalistic governance of mental health practices and advocacy fail to locate mental health problems in the broader spectrum of personal, social, political, and economic lives.

Treatment Gap in Mental Healthcare

There is a wide treatment gap in Indian mental healthcare. This article discusses the treatment gap and the contributing factors, and suggests ways to reduce it. The political (policy perspective), social (stigma, discrimination, and gender), cultural (beliefs, explanations, and help-seeking behaviours), and economic (direct and indirect costs of treatment) factors addressed have long impeded mental healthcare. A policy and research review reflects that mental illness in India contributes significantly to the global occurrence of mental illness. The treatment gap causes substantial losses to individuals, families, society, and the nation. Innovation and capacity building are necessary to develop and implement locally relevant, feasible, and effective community-based mental healthcare models.

Let’s Not Call Things ‘Crazy’: Language and Portrayal of Mental Illness

Neurodiversity holds that atypical neural configurations of certain mental conditions are too diverse to be collectively "othered" as abnormal. The antecedents of neurodiversity are addressed in this article by understanding media representations of neuroatypicality and how words construct our perceptions regarding the mentally ill. This evolution, partly due to a climate of political correctness, is apparent when comparing the language of the Lunacy Act (1858) with the Mental Health Care Act (2017).

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