ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

MemorySubscribe to Memory

Reinventing the Commons

The article makes a case for the reinvention of the commons in the social sciences. The individual treatment of rights reduces the collective to a mass of persons. Instead the commons acknowledges the inviolate place of humans as part of the cosmos. The marginal and dissenting imagination must invoke the poetry of nature as it engages the current politics and economics. The commons, in its diversity, seeks wisdom through a dialogue of knowledges, moving beyond traditional “publics,” and “time.”

 

Gamak Ghar and Remembrance of Things Past

Watching Gamak Ghar, the author attempts a reconciliation with abandoned origins, an uprooted childhood and the undispersed family that used to be.

Memory, Death, Friendship

Having lost a dear friend, the author reflects on the nature of friendship, and its relationship with memory.

Reflections and Reminiscences

Can we ever pre-empt which experiences might form a memory and which might not?

Memories and Memorials of the Mizo National Front Movement

The narrative of peace in Mizoram has become a part of national memory, but it is also embedded in larger politics of erasing a violent past. This is, in part, associated with the state agenda of presenting a “successful” case of conflict management, along with its refusal to acknowledge its violent actions. Tension over the issue of memorialisation continues to resurface at the local level, across political spectrums and local organisations—a consequence of the purported exclusion of violent memories in the official narratives and the neglect of “other” voices within the narrative of the movement. In this regard, the construction and contestation of the narrative of “peace” in Mizoram and the politics associated with its commemoration, merit further examination.

Past, Present, and Oral History

Oral history is an aid to movements for social justice across the world. It is particularly significant in countries like India where literacy levels are low and where memories of the oppressed are routinely erased from public memory. This article questions the presumed superiority of the written over the oral. It presents a critique of “establishment” historiography and suggests that historians should adopt a receptive and balanced approach to different forms of history. Oral history reorients the historian’s craft in interesting ways. The oral history method is crucial for capturing histories that flourish outside the dominant narratives of modern societies.

History and Memory

Memory, Identity, Power: Politics in the Jungle Mahals 1890-1950 by Ranabir Samaddar; Orient Longman, 1998; pp viii+295, Rs 250.

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