ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Matting of Hair among Women in South-western India

Matting of hair is a neglected health problem in India with religious undertones and paucity of research on it. To capture the experiential understanding of matting of hair among women in south-western India, an interpretive phenomenological study was conducted. The thematic accounts of affected women uncovered the health and human rights marginalisation surrounding the matting of hair, effectively making it a neglected harmful cultural practice.

Ghettoisation of Economic Choices in a Global City

The “rise” of India on the global economic landscape has been accompanied by the revival of debates regarding the role played by social institutions such as caste, religion and gender in shaping an individual’s life chances. This paper engages with this debate by looking at a micro-level case study of the occupational choices of Muslim ex-millworkers in Mumbai city. Religion as a social institution combined with negative emotions and a lack of political patronage creates barriers for Muslims in the labour market, compelling them to seek livelihood opportunities in a ghettoised economy.

How Kerala’s Poor Tribals Are Being Branded As 'Mentally Ill'

Paternalistic governance of mental health practices and advocacy fail to locate mental health problems in the broader spectrum of personal, social, political, and economic lives.

Africa in Evian

The two central premises of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (Nepad) crafted in 2000-01 were that deeper integration into the world economy would benefit the continent and that the proponents of Nepad would discipline Africa's dictators. Neither has happened. Will Nepad be revived at the G-8 meeting at Evian?

Determinants of Well-Being among Widows

The state of widowhood is both a personal condition and a social institution. Widowhood brings about severe social, economic and cultural deprivations. In this paper, we study the well-being of widows in terms of the impact that social marginalisation and economic dependence has on their psychological and physical conditions. The emerging trends have been discussed after a detailed analysis of data.

Crimes against Women in India

Data on crime in India are published annually by the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB). These are compiled from records of police stations all over the country and refer to reported and registered crime. For recent years the data cover crimes against women in some detail, disaggregated to the district level. Reporting of crime tends to be incomplete; so the data are prima facie suspect. Nevertheless, they may be useful in studying regional variations, considering that underreporting is a universal feature. Social scientists have neglected the study of crime despite its increasing presence in our daily lives. This paper is an attempt to see what official, published data reveal, whether there are clear-cut regional patterns and if so whether they can lead to meaningful hypotheses for future work.
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