ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

MaharashtraSubscribe to Maharashtra

Symbiotic Federalism

The federal government should be the manifestation of the principle of fairness towards the states.

Not by Prosperity Alone

The Paradox of Rural Development in India: The Devapur Experience by Suresh Suratwala, Bhopal: Kishore Bharati, 2020; pp 197, ₹ 150 (paperback).

Farmer Suicides in Maharashtra, 2001–2018

Farmer suicides are an unfortunate result of the agrarian distress plaguing the rural economy of many states of the country. Marathwada and Vidarbha regions in Maharashtra have recorded very high numbers of farmer suicides, and an attempt to calculate the number of suicides and the suicide mortality rate is the first step towards gaining an in-depth understanding of the prevalence and seriousness of the issue. An analysis of the data reveals the relationship between farmer suicides and issues such as monsoon failure, water shortage, drought, absence of social security, robust crop procurement mechanisms and increasing debt burdens.

Implementation of Community Forest Rights

The Vidarbha region of Maharashtra presents a unique case in the implementation of community forest rights where much of the region’s potential community forest rights claims have been recognised in the name of gram sabhas under the Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006. The key factors like the collective action of gram sabhas , the role of non-governmental organisations, grassroots organisations, and state implementing agencies, and their collaboration in advancing the implementation of cfr are explained here. There is need to support the upscaling of cfr across India, and to analyse the broader implications for forest resource governance at a national scale.

How Political Parties Exploit the Anti-Defection Law to Form Governments

The Anti-Defection Law has several loopholes that obstruct the democratic functioning of the electoral process.

Promoting Farm Ponds

Although the article “Problematic Uses and Practices of Farm Ponds in Maharashtra” (EPW, 21 January 2017) by Eshwer Kale rightfully highlights pertinent issues regarding the policy of promoting farm ponds and the manner in which farmers are using these structures; the solutions espoused by the author and the Maharashtra government are devoid of expertise regarding technicalities related to terrain, geography and water-pumping technologies.

Party with a Difference?

From adopting winnability as the core principle of nominating candidates to removing political appointees of the previous government, and in dealing with governments of opposition parties, the behaviour of the Bharatiya Janata Party has been so much like the Congress that the latter would rejoice in the assurance that there is no mukti from its ways and manners. The crucial difference between the BJP and other parties is that it is able to instil a sense of destiny not just among its rank and file but also the general public and convince it that the party is doing desh seva while others have been doing only politics.

Poverty and Deprivation among the Katkari

This article examines evidence for poverty and deprivation amongst the Katkaris, a Scheduled Tribe, in hamlets in Jahwar and Mokhada talukas of Palghar district, Maharashtra. It analyses how Katkaris are trapped in a vicious cycle of social, educational, and economic backwardness.

Perpetual Areas of Darkness

Malnutrition deaths in Maharashtra's tribal belt expose indifference of successive governments.

Regional Divide in Banking Development in Maharashtra

An enquiry into the regional distribution of banking in Maharashtra comparing the rural and urban areas of the state and various divisions and districts dispels the commonly held notion that the state is a well-banked one. The aggregated indicators of banking development conceal the reality of an extremely wide divide in the distribution of banking between the urban and rural areas. This is essentially a reflection of the district-wise divide between Mumbai and the other districts, particularly those from central and eastern Maharashtra or Amravati, Nagpur and Aurangabad divisions, which have been identified in the literature as economically backward districts and have also been associated with a high incidence of agrarian distress in recent times. With a thrust on the policy of financial inclusion since 2005, there has been an increase in the number of bank branches in underbanked districts of the state. However, this increase has not helped in correcting the regional divide in bank credit and hence, most districts other than Mumbai continue to be significantly credit-deprived.

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