ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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V N Datta: ​A Student’s Reminiscence

V N Datta, Professor Emeritus of History, Kurukshetra University, breathed his last on 30 November 2020. He was 94. His long life was what, by any standards, would be judged as happy, fulfilling, and very productive; except for his very last years when an unsuccessful hip surgery kept him...

​The Circle of Reason in a Post-COVID-19 World

Amitav Ghosh’s novel goads us to seriously rethink our world, and finds new relevance under current circumstances.

A Donkey’s Wisdom

The recent clash between Indian and Chinese soldiers in the Galwan Valley has unleashed a new wave of anti-China sentiment and violent rhetoric in India. Can literature help us respond to the China–India border clash more ethically. Krishan Chander’s 1964 novel Ek Gadha Nefa Mein (A Donkey in NEFA), based on the 1962 China–India border conflict, offers a way of denouncing the destruction of war without leaving unquestioned the inherently violent task of drawing and defending national borders. The satirical novel tells the story of its protagonist, a talking donkey, caught in the front-lines of Tawang, and bearing witness to the atrocities of war. Through his witty and wise donkey, Chander challenges us to shift the terms of our outrage beyond national categories and to stand instead on the side of a humanism that knows no national borders.

Yaruingam (1960): Revisiting the Assamese Literary Classic and its Idea of People’s Rule

Birendra Kumar Bhattacharyya’s novel Yaruingam, written in the 1950s and finally published in 1960, was centred on the Naga movement for self-determination. In the post-colonial period, the novel has often been considered a landmark literary moment of Assamese literature, especially in the writing of political novels. Though focusing on the Naga movement, the novel was also as much about an early postcolonial Assamese literary imagination of “people’s rule.” Today, when questions of identity, democracy, and of the place of people in shaping the sociocultural and political future of North East India have become critical, this article examines how this early postcolonial novel dealt with some of these questions.

A Case for Collaborative Translation of Literary Texts in South Asia

Translation of contemporary works of literature from one South Asian language into another has a great potential for developing a shared understanding of the region’s diverse linguistic cultures. The author shares his experience of translating and editing translations of novels, short stories, poetry, and literary non-fiction from South Asia and elsewhere into Urdu.

Censorship through the Ages

The Writer, the Reader and the State: Literary Censorship in India by Mini Chandran, New Delhi, California, London and Singapore: Sage Publications, 2017; pp xxxv + 191, ` 695.

Past and Present

The Last Hindu Emperor: Prithviraj Chauhan and the Indian Past, 1200–2000 by Cynthia Talbot, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017; pp 316, $99.99.

Capitalism, Empire and Climate

The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable by Amitav Ghosh, Gurgaon, Haryana: Penguin, 2016; pp 284, ` 399.

Gurdial Singh, Voice ofthe Voiceless

In novel after novel, Gurdial Singh (1933–2016) created sensitive and memorable vignettes of how multiple forms of oppression worked through our social structures, often crippling those who remain trapped within. He won the Jnanpith award for Parsa , the second Punjabi after Amrita Pritam to win the prestigious award. Singh’s work is arguably among the best of world literature.

Women Writing

Storylines: Conversations with Women Writers edited by Ammu Joseph, Vasanth Kannabiran, Ritu Menon, Gouri Salvi, Volga; published by Women’s World(India), Delhi, and Asmita Resource Centre for Women, Hyderabad, 2003; pp 312, Rs 250. Tense Past, Tense Present: Women Writing in English edited by Joel Kurotti; published by Stree, an imprint of Bhatkal and Sen, Kolkata, 2003; pp 235, Rs 450.

Politics of and in Literature

The National Board of Secondary Education has obviously not heard of Premchand and so when it found that a book by him had been prescribed for one of its courses, it promptly had it removed. But when writers are unconcerned about what murky deals are struck in connection with a 'vishwa' conference of and in their own language, they should not be surprised at what has happened to the Premchand text.

The Locations of Hindi

Hindi Nationalism by Alok Rai , Tracts for the Times 13, Orient Longman, Delhi, 2000; pp 138, Rs 150.

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