ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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First Amendment to Constitution of India

India's Constitution has been amended over a hundred times since its inception in 1950. The landmark amendments are discussed with special emphasis on the first amendment, which altered the way the freedom of speech and expression was originally understood by the framers of the Constitution.

Vicious Cycle of Stigma

“Is a Ragpicker’s Child Likely To Be a Ragpicker?” by Venkatesh Murthy R (EPW, 27 February 2016) reminds me of children of female sex workers in red-light areas. Ragpicking, sex work, and so forth (as parental occupations) are considered a stigma by mainstream ­society. In female sex worker...

A Dalit's Caste

If the law does not just mean fixity of rules but also capacity to dispense justice, can patrilineality be a fair and sufficient ground for pronouncing judgment on a caste identity?

Anti-Terrorism Legislation

We need a wider perspective on our anti-terrorism laws which comparison with similar laws elsewhere alone can provide.

Tax Change with Retrospective Effect

The legality and propriety of the retrospective withdrawal of excise duty exemption for cigarettes and pan masala manufactured in the north-east. A critical examination.

Torture in Colonial India

The impact of colonialism also evidenced itself in the attempts to establish a codified system of criminal law that differentiated and separated itself from the 'native' law that preceded it. Despite such attempts, native practices had their own uses in enforcing discipline as seen in the incidents that unfold in the 'Nassick Torture Case' and elaborated further in this paper. The paper also probes issues related to fear and suffering while also enunciating the social scientists' dilemma of needing to represent and reproduce violence without fetishising or merely re-enacting it.

Civil Liberties : New TADA by Ordinance?

The news that the centre is planning to promulgate an ordinance for dealing with terrorist crimes must be viewed with trepidation. An ordinance is after all a last resort, when there are circumstances requiring urgent legislative action which cannot wait for the due process of law-making. Surely, notwithstanding the emerging new perception of terrorism, there is little justification for forgoing the process of parliamentary debate and decision-making?

Globalisation of Human Rights

The Law of Human Rights by Richard Clayton and Hugh Tomlinson; Oxford University Press; pp 1,670, 285. £ 145, per set of Vols 1 and 2;

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