ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles By Land

Land Regulations and Doing Business in Himachal Pradesh

Land management has a far-reaching effect on growth, distribution of incomes, and spatial spread of economic activities. The governments, therefore, play a crucial role in establishing and supporting an ecosystem for firms by enacting laws and making rules that establish and clarify property rights, reducing the cost of disputes resolution and increasing the predictability of economic transactions. This article attempts to carry out a diagnostic analysis of land laws and practices in Himachal Pradesh and identifies the problem areas for regulatory reforms and makes a case for taking up regulatory impact assessment.

Climatic Trends, Cropping Pattern Shifts, and Migration of Rice in India

The rice area in India has shown a mild shift, both temporally and spatially—from the rain-fed eastern belt to the drier north-west, served by controlled irrigation—despite a declining trend of rainfall observed in both the regions. The shift is part of the broader changes in land use.

Understanding Metabolic Rift through Assemblage of Land and Intersectional Inequalities in India

Climate change has become one of the most burning concerns of our living times. Using the Marxian concept of ‘metabolic rift’, we illuminate the complex nature-society relationship in India. We do so by understanding the rift advanced by neo-liberal capitalism through the assemblage of land and intersectional inequalities. We argue that the intersecting inequalities based on social (power) relations are exacerbated during climate change; in particular, the neo-liberal capitalist interventions have created disproportionate impacts of climate change among rural communities shaped by the unequal land relations in India. In the light of the IPCC AR6 report, we indicate few potential mechanisms of healing/repairing the metabolic rift; however, we caution the ineffectiveness of healing efforts without addressing the socio-spatial injustices. We highlight that the equitable redistributional justice challenging the existing socio-spatial power relations remains a critical concern, without which, even in the efforts of repairing the rift, the structural inequalities may still be reproduced in the new landscapes.

Dynamics of Caste and Landlessness

The effects of land acquisition processes and poor urban planning on Dalits and the marginalised landless population are analysed. How minor changes in laws and policymaking processes can change or prevent future policy issues by addressing landlessness-borne issues in consistency with sustainable development goals and social inclusion is examined. This study aims to understand the complexities and transitory socio-economic problems underlying urban development planning. It finds that poor and marginal landless village residents, who had little to no idea about the land acquired for a public purpose, undoubtedly faced the most unfavourable outcomes in the course of rural to urban development.

 

Seeing Mumbai through Its Hinterland

The “money in the city, votes in the countryside” dynamic meant that in the past, agrarian propertied classes wielded enough power to draw capital and resources from cities into the rural hinterland. However, as cities cease to be mere sites of extraction, agrarian elites have sought new terms of inclusion in contemporary India’s market-oriented urban growth, most visible in the endeavour of the political class to facilitate the entry of the “sugar constituency” into Mumbai’s real estate markets.