ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

LabourSubscribe to Labour

Economic Reforms and Industrial Structure in India

This paper focuses on the impact of India's economic reforms on industrial structure and productivity. It reveals a disappointing overall performance in both output growth and employment. This, however, is not the result of exogenous factors,but the consequence of the type of policies being followed under economic reforms. If mistakes were made in the past, they need to be corrected. But efforts should be made to ensure that demand is high enough for more output to be produced, more people to be employed, poverty to be reduced.

An Informalised Labour System

The textile mill closures in Ahmedabad cost over 1,00,000 jobs, and resulted in the informalisation of a vast majority of the sacked workers. Gujarat can thus be understood as an experiment for trying out what will happen to state and society under a policy regime that does not attempt to harness the most brutal consequences of a market-led mode of capitalist protection. The total eclipse of Gandhian values has also led to the shrinking of the social space needed for humanising economic growth.

Social Implications of Voluntary Retirement Scheme

The impact of voluntary retirement schemes has had wide-ranging impact on the nature of employment, and is changing the quality of workers' lives. One of the effects is the increasing casualisation of labour. This article examines the nature of change in the quality of life among workers who have accepted VRS, locating some of the problems in the context of the employers' attitude to VRS.

Labour Process in the Informal Sector

This paper attempts to study the features of the labour process in a transitional situation, on the basis of a field survey in the informal handloom weaving sector in Nadia district. This process depends largely on the nature of the institutional arrangement in the sector, where usury capital has a strong presence due to the influence of the merchant lender, the 'mahajan'. The deskilling tendency associated with the relation between the producer and the mahajan and the unity of conception and execution in some cases are among the characteristics that describe this labour process.

Tough Challenges in Informal Sector

Informal Sector in India: Perspectives and Policies edited by Amitabh Kundu and Alakh N Sharma; Institute for Human Development and Institute of Applied Manpower Research, New Delhi, 2001;

Employment and Poverty in 1990s

The release of the Provisional Population Totals based on Population Census 2001 necessitates revisions in the estimates of population and of workforce for 1993-94 and 1999-2000 and hence also in the estimates of labour productivity. Besides carrying out the necessary revisions in the size of the workforce (and in labour productivity), this paper offers a detailed industrial distribution of the workforce as well as an occupation distribution of the workforce based on the additional tables now available from the NSS 55th Round Employment-Unemployment Survey.

Redevelopment of Mumbai s Cotton Textile Mill Land-Opportunity Lost

The decline of textile industry heralds the de-industrialisation of Mumbai, manifested in the exodus of workers from the city's mill areas. The mill-owners in order to earn bigger revenue are resorting to subterfuge in disposing of their land, workers and assets under the pretext of 'modernising' their mills. None of the agencies involved, from central government to state government institutions and the municipal authorities, appears to be unduly concerned about this major change in industrial heartland of Mumbai In order to retain the social heritage of Girangaon, and most importantly, to retain as many jobs as possible, the state government instead of permitting piecemeal, haphazard growth through clandestine plot-by-plot sale of mill land, should actively intervene to bring together lands belonging to different mills in a particular area, so that they can be put to best possible socially relevant use.

Mumbai's Textile Mills and the Land Question

In refusing to give permission to textile mills in Mumbai to sell their land the Maharashtra government gives the impression that it is being sympathetic to the cause of the mill workers, but actually it is pandering to the builders' lobby. The take-no-decision policy of the state government does not mean, however, that changes will not take place, albeit haphazardly and clandestinely. Based on recent developments, some likely scenarios are sketched here.

Mumbai Textile Mills Land-High Cost of Inaction

The continuing indecision about the land belonging to the textile mills in Mumbai has hurt the dry, poor and rich alike. In a city starved of land for housing, commerce and recreation, the bringing of 300 to 400 acres of centrally-located land on the market cannot but have a desirable impact, particularly if a large chunk of the new land were to be earmarked for low income housing at high density.

Cotton Mill Workers in Bombay, 1875 to 1918-Conditions of Work and Life

Conditions of Work and Life Shashi Bhushan Upadhyay On the basis of evidence from contemporary sources, this paper attempts to capture the domestic and workplace environment of the early cotton mill workers in Bombay city. The long hours of work in the mills exhausted the workers both physically and mentally The physical environment of their homes was no better; neglected by the authorities and exploited by private builders, the workers lived in ill-lighted, ill-ventilated dens in largely undeveloped, undrained areas. To find solace from this hard life of labour the workers often resorted to alcohol drinking. The regular intake of alcohol coupled with their hard work in the mills and the polluted atmosphere both at home and in the mills weakened their resistance and made them easy prey to various diseases, the lack of organised labour activity during the period under study was also attributable to the grim daily routine of the workers.

Pages

Back to Top