ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Theoretical Analysis of ‘Demonetisation’

With the aid of simple theoretical tools used in classroom lectures, the implications of the recent “demonetisation” exercise in India are analysed. It lends support to conclusions reached by other authors on the impact of demonetisation with the aid of available data. Following Robert Lucas’s Nobel lecture, the merits of economic policies that assume the form of random shocks to an economic system are questioned.

Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Modelling

In recent years Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium models have come to play an increasing role in central banks, as an aid in the formulation of monetary policy (and increasingly after the global crisis, for maintaining financial stability). DSGE models, it is claimed, are less a-theoretic than other widely used models such as VAR, or dynamic factor models. As the models are "structural," they are supposed to be immune to the Lucas Critique, and thus can be "taken to the data" in a meaningful way. However, a major feature of these models is that their theoretical underpinnings lie in what has now come to be called as the New Consensus Macroeconomics. Using the prototype real business cycle model as an illustration, this paper brings out the econometric structure underpinning such models. A detailed analytical critique is also presented together with some promising leads for future research.

The New Keynesian Paradigm of Monetary Policy

While Keynes was sceptical of the efficacy of monetary policy , the current mainstream macroeconomic consensus , "New" Keynesian macroeconomics , accords it primacy in the process of maintaining both price and output stability. This consensus depends on three relationships: demand is inversely dependent on the interest rate, inflation is positively related to the output gap and the central bank can control interest rates to achieve an optimum combination of price and output. This paper presents a theoretical critique of this consensus from an "old" Keynesian perspective since Keynes had raised fundamental objections to each of the three relationships .
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