ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

KarnatakaSubscribe to Karnataka

Water Markets : Public Resource and Private Appropriation

The emergence of water markets has been a consequence of the popular use of groundwater and now increasingly surface water resources for irrigation. But as this paper explains, while this may have helped raise agricultural output, it has also seen a widening of rural inequalities and has had an adverse impact on the interests of small and marginal farmers and other weaker sections of society.

Fertility Transition in Karnataka

Using data from official statistics, census and surveys, this paper traces fertility transition of Karnataka and explains factors responsible for slow pace in comparison to other south Indian states. There exist considerable regional disparities with regard to health and demographic indicators. Fertility decline has been faster in southern and coastal regions, and at a tardy pace in backward northern districts characterised by low literacy, low female age at marriage, poor health infrastructure and low status of women.

Culture of Agriculture

Harbingers of Rain: Land and Life in South India by A R Vasavi; Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 1999; pp xiv+178, Rs 325.

Drought in Karnataka

Karnataka is reeling under its worst drought in 10 years in the wake of the failure of the south-west monsoon. The symptoms were visible two months ago, but the state machinery is only now gearing up to tackle the situation, even as incidents of crop loss, cattle deaths, and mass migration of labour come to the fore. The state has sought financial assistance from the centre, but the question is how efficiently the money is spent and whether it reaches the needy. Ultimately, however, only long-term measures, such as rejuvenating the natural resource base, will help to tackle the scourge of drought.

Government Wage Policies in Public Sector, 1947-1982

Since independence the government has striven to adopt wage fixation policies with regard to public sector organised labour. Initially the role was discharged by the judiciary and a while later by a tripartite machinery - the wage boards. However, the setting up of the Bureau of Public Enterprises in the early 1960s signalled a shift to greater centralisation. Despite the bureau's existence as a 'supra-bureaucracy', its attempts to impose wage standardisation and salary restraints, but for a brief period during the emergency years, proved by and large ineffectual.

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