IrrigationSubscribe to Irrigation

Sustainable Use of Water for Irrigation in Indian Agriculture

Given the technology and public policy, institutions concerning water use hold the key to raising water productivity by bridging the vast gap that now exists between knowledge and its application. Water institutions are a relatively new and challenging area of interdisciplinary research for social scientists.

Water Markets : Public Resource and Private Appropriation

The emergence of water markets has been a consequence of the popular use of groundwater and now increasingly surface water resources for irrigation. But as this paper explains, while this may have helped raise agricultural output, it has also seen a widening of rural inequalities and has had an adverse impact on the interests of small and marginal farmers and other weaker sections of society.

Living with Floods

Modern flood control technologies have neither been very successful nor are they people-friendly. This is because their focus is on trying to control the waters of rivers in spate and not of making use of the flood waters in the best possible way, while ensuring the least damage. This forms the basis of flood 'management' traditionally in many villages in Bihar, West Bengal and Bangladesh.

Tenancy Inefficiency

While several attempts have been made to explain the inefficiencies of sharecropping systems found in developing economics, they have been marked by certain definitional flaws. A more rigorous analysis of sharecropping that incorporates 'size-class' differences among owners and tenants thus becomes necessary. Earlier studies had also stressed on land productivity and intensity of farm resource utilisation as indicators of efficiency, but they are seen as measures of relative efficiency only under restrictive assumptions. This study stresses on the availability of irrigation resources as a factor that increases efficiency - for both owners and tenants.

Pages

Back to Top