ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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LIC IPO

There are serious apprehensions that post initial public offering, the Life Insurance Corporation of India would have to change its very business model, whereby it will have to push for the sale of more non-participatory policies as 100% of profits from such policies will flow to the shareholders. Thet neglect of the rural business will hurt the interests of the lower-middle and poorer sections who look at LIC policies as an instrument of social security.

Putting a Price on Life

The relaxation of the COVID-19 pandemic-induced lockdown and resumption of factory operations amid diluted labour laws have led to a spree of “industrial accidents” and workplace deaths. Monetary compensation, once a hard-won victory for the working class, has been incorporated into institutional corporate strategy and state control where reimbursing deaths with money has become an everyday business for employers as workplace conditions continue to be fraught with weak labour laws and safety measures. The new labour codes continue this strategy.

Experiences with Government-sponsored Health Insurance Schemes in Indian States

The implications of expanding government-sponsored health insurance schemes in India are analysed from a fiscal perspective. The experiences of two of the earliest and largest GSHI schemes of the country implemented in Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu are examined. The results suggest that the expansion of the GSHI schemes may skew expenditure away from primary and secondary care towards tertiary care if the fiscal space is limited. A competitive public health system may help in containing costs and the corresponding fiscal burden. The effectiveness of public spending through such schemes is ambiguous.

Role of ‘Fintech’ in Financial Inclusion and New Business Models

The convergence of finance and technology to provide financial services by non-financial institutions, popularly known as “fintech,” has come to dominate the financial landscape. Taking stock of this development, its impact and implications for new products, processes and services, including for financial inclusion are examined. The Jan Dhan–Aadhaar–mobile phones trinity provides fertile ground for fintech to permeate to the “last mile.” Notwithstanding its manifold benefits, there is a need to exercise caution in areas such as privacy and ownership of data. In a fast-paced world of rapidly evolving technology and related financial services, regulators have new paradigms to grapple with and therefore, need to be proactive so as to not stifle the growth of this nascent sector.

Promoting Private Healthcare

The Rajasthan government’s Bhama­shah Health Insurance Scheme claims to benefit over 1.10 crore families encompassing around 4.65 crore people in the state through a smart card-based cashless health cover. The state government has allocated Rs 370 crore for this on an annual basis and a memorandum...

Private Health Insurance and Health Costs

The IRDA Bill and the consequent opening up of the health insurance sector to foreign and private investors' raises several questions. Are Indians ready for private health insurance? Will there be demand from all sections of society? What would consumers look for when they 'purchase' insurance to cover future health risks, a concept hitherto non-existent in India? These are some of the questions this paper attempts to answer, based on data collected in Delhi from about 500 households. The study found a wide disparity across sections on willingness to participate. The challenges for the new system would be to pool individuals across risk and economic status categories; set up a multi-tier system to meet objectives of equity and efficiency in health care delivery and for planners and regulators, to keep health insurance separate from other non-health insurance.

Economic Consequences of Gujarat Earthquake

Even though the impact of the earthquake on the Gujarat's GSDP may not exceed a quarter per cent, it presents many challenges. Putting in place a proper policy framework may not only restore normalcy in the region, but can start a recovery boom. Estimating the loss from the earthquake is important for devising policies and drawing up requirements for assistance both from within and outside India. However, given all the limitations of the data, firm estimates of losses from the recent quake will take time to compile. In the interim, quantification is critical for designing relief and rehabilitation packages and implementing them before the onset of the monsoon. This paper is an attempt to estimate the economic impact of the earthquake.
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