ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Cross-Border Terrorism

The cross-border terrorism sponsored by Pakistan has to be situated in the broader context of the burgeoning terrorism that has plagued contemporary Pakistan. The links between top army personnel, bureaucrats and political leaders, on the one hand, and terrorists and drug barons, on the other, have acquired a measure of legitimacy under the banner of Islam and jihad. The transnational links of terrorist outfits also necessitate international coalitions to weed out terrorism. Nevertheless the India-Pakistan peace initiatives that are currently under way represent a positive development because they can make an incremental contribution to ending cross-border terrorism.

Misreading Partition Road Signs

History does not retrace its steps. It is no longer useful to ask if the partition could have been avoided. The question is no longer important. The different perceptions of the shared history of India and Pakistan have, perhaps, contributed in some measure to create barriers of prejudice between the two nations. However, there are issues of history that need to be looked at again. This article attempts to highlight some of those contentious and often ill-understood issues. Offered here is an attempt by a sociologist-cum-social anthropologist to highlight some issues. It is not an alternative history.

Two Elections - Two Sides of the Coin

The resumption of the Indo-Pak dialogue appears to have been hinged on the conduct of 'free and fair' elections in Pakistan as well as Jammu and Kashmir. Now, although the US has given both Vajpayee and Musharraf clean chits on that count, there appear to be no signs of new initiatives between the two countries. In fact in the post poll scenario, the influence of the hawks on their respective governments appear to be set to increase.

A Letter to India: In Manto's Spirit

On the lines of Sadat Hasan Manto's facetious letters to Uncle Sam written at the height of the cold war when Pakistan was being wooed by the US as an ally to fight communism, a letter to prime minister Vajpayee, This letter is a spirited assessment of the most recent standoff between India and Pakistan, peppered with rare insights that have always been Manto's hallmark.

Geopolitics and Regional Identity: South Asia's North-West Frontiers

Kashmir and Sindh – NationBuilding, Ethnicity and Regional Politics in South Asia by Suranjan Das; Department of History Monograph, University of Calcutta and K P Bagchi and Co, Kolkata, 2001; Rs 380. War and Diplomacy in Kashmir, 1947-48 by C Dasgupta; Sage Publications, New Delhi, 2002; paperback, Rs 250.

Tryst with Fate

The origins of the tension between India and Pakistan go beyond diplomatic imperatives, as each country is keen to pose itself as America's lead ally in the region. This paper while situating the relationship between the two nations against the backdrop of new American imperalism, argues that the conflict will remain unresolved until its very terms and those defining partition, the relationships between communities too, are revisited.

Possession and Deployment of Nuclear Weapons in South Asia

This paper examines some of operational requirements and the dangers that come with the possibility that in the foreseeable future India and Pakistan may deploy their nuclear arsenals. The authors first describe the analytical basis for the inevitability of accidents in complex high-technology systems. Then they turn to potential failures of nuclear command and control and early warning systems as examples. They go on to discuss the possibility and consequences of accidental explosions involving nuclear weapons and their delivery systems. Finally some measures to reduce these risks are suggested.

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