ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Indian MuslimsSubscribe to Indian Muslims

Locating Elite Muslims’ India through Their Writings

Autobiographies and memoirs of Ashraf Muslims reveal that in their perception and presentation of the issues of Muslims vis-à-vis the state/democracy, secularism becomes a dominant concern, while the question of caste among Muslims is pushed to oblivion.

Politics and Self-representation of Online Muslim Youth

This article is an exploration into the self-representation of online Muslim youth and their engagement with contemporary politics. It is based on an analysis of responses to tweets on the recent Bihar assembly election.

Identity and Status of the Indian Muslim

Indian Muslim(s) after Liberalization by Maidul Islam, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2019; pp xxi + 313, ₹ 995.

Muslim Minorities and UPA Regime

The Struggle for Equality: India’s Muslims and Rethinking the UPA Experience by Heewon Kim, Cambridge University Press, 2019; pp 260, ₹ 695.

Secularising the 'Secular'

The Taj Mahal can also be seen as a religious place of worship, as the local Muslim community is allowed to offer prayers at the mosque situated inside the Taj complex. The monument is also privy to two kinds of publics - a congregation that offers prayers at the mosque, paying no attention to the central building, and a "public", which stays at the central building and seems to follow the given official meanings of the Taj as a world heritage site. Is it possible to look at the Taj merely as a secular historical monument? If yes, how can we respond to the religious meanings embedded in the very architectural composition of the buildings? Are Muslims, as a religious minority, entitled to use spaces such as the mosque in the Taj Mahal to offer congregational prayers? This article explores these questions to understand the practice and politics of "secularism" in postcolonial India.

Mapping the Enemy

The images of Islam which inform the RSS and its carefully nurtured and directed hatred are not limited to the Hindu right alone but are found in popular and academic discourses both in India and the west. They bear little relation to the reality of Islam as lived by Muslims in India and around the world where faithful adherence to the tradition coexists with tolerance of other faiths. But this reality exists outside the Orientalist grids which inform our understanding of Islam.

Islamic Perspectives on Liberation and Dialogue in Contemporary India

This survey suggests that increasing numbers of Muslims, particularly from long-marginalised 'low' caste groups, are now demanding that their voices be heard, thereby seeking to challenge the established Muslim leadership as spokesmen of Islam and representatives of the community. These voices of dissent are significant in that they offer an interesting case of 'lay' perspectives on Islam that emerges from a situation of struggle against oppression. In this sense, they can be said to represent a form of what can be called an Islamic theology of liberation.
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