ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Historical FictionSubscribe to Historical Fiction

Past Continuous

In the early 20th century, when K M Munshi was making a name for himself in the literary and cultural sphere of Gujarat, he was both intervening in and departing from the past. Curating elements of the past that suited his equally curated modernity, Munshi exemplifies many connections that become evident of Gujarat in the subsequent years. In this paper, we ask: “What was Munshi’s past?” In other words, whom was he responding to from the 19th century? The period of our inquiry in Munshi’s life is the one that witnessed the famous Patan trilogy. The questions are situated in both cultural history and literature.

Imagined Women

Women’s Images, Men’s Imagination: Female Characters in Bengali Fiction in Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century by Banani Mukhia; Manohar, New Delhi, 2002; pp 167, Rs 325

Solipsism or Solidarity

Among postcolonial novels, Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children and Pramoedya's Buru quartet bear a clear resemblance, for both are responses to the degeneration seen in postcolonial societies. This article, a comparative study of the two novels, seeks to understand the value of the realistic historical novel; the individual's relation to the national community; the reasons for the degeneration of postcolonial societies and the significance of exile.
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