ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Teaching Macroeconomics

The Economy presents a new approach to teaching macroeconomics. It starts from real-life institutions of macroeconomic policy management, teaching models that engage directly with these institutions. Money and monetary policy are explained in the context of modern banking systems, while the Phillips curve is derived from the labour market model. By emphasising empirical applicability, and the linkages with microeconomics, it provides students with a more intuitive and realistic understanding than standard approaches.

Macroeconomics in The Economy

The Economy is a worthwhile initiative that seeks to teach students about the economy, as opposed to teaching economics. The macroeconomic aspects of the textbook are critically scrutinised to understand what is being taught, and how different the treatment is from extant approaches.

TISS Students Strike: Privatisation of Education Threatens Social Justice

The ongoing student strike at Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai comes in the wake of reduced funding, withdrawal of scholarship for students from marginalised backgrounds, and disproportionate increase in fees. It brings to light the increasing privatisation of higher education under the current political regime, which has brought about erosion of principles of social justice and affirmative action.

Why India Needs JNU

A lifelong associate of Jawaharlal Nehru University reflects on what JNU means to higher education, research, and indeed what it means to the people of India.

Targeting Institutions of Higher Education

The ideology central to the Bharatiya Janata Party-Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh has no space or use for liberal thought and values. Education for such organisations means only what can be called a kind of catechism. This is a memorisation of a narrow set of questions rooted in faith and belief and an equally narrow set of answers that prohibit any doubt or deviation. Therefore, educational centres that allow questioning and discussion are anathema and have to be dismantled.

Australia in India

If the 1990s marked an intensification of the process of `globalisation', within the policy discourse of the higher education sector that process has manifested itself through the idea of the `international university'. In part, internationalisation implies a redefinition of higher education as a globally marketed commodity or as an export oriented `industry'. These developments are examined by means of an analysis of the internationalisation of Australian education, and the operational procedures, strategies, and expansionist market objectives of Australian higher education institutions in India. It is argued that, under the hegemony of neo-liberal ideology, these international linkages are emerging as a result of the transformation and restructuring of the higher education sector in both nations.

Contract Appointments and Standards in Higher Education

The University Grants Commission (UGC) has never required universities and colleges to implement systems that tightly evaluate faculty performance. In fact, its moves over the last decade have, if anything, been in precisely the opposite direction. Thus today not only is a faculty appointee assured of job security fairly quickly, when hired against a permanent vacancy, s/he is also guaranteed promotions to successively higher levels based on the number of years of service put in at each level. Against this background, the recent UGC proposal that faculty appointments in institutions of higher education should henceforth be on contract for a limited term will serve one purpose and one purpose alone - that of reducing the central and state governments' expenditure on higher education. To believe that the proposal was motivated by a desire to improve standards of teaching and research in these institutions would be to doubt the intelligence of the eminent members of the UGC.

Brain Drain and Education Systems

The phenomenon of brain drain, now deemed to have reached irreversible proportions is but a symptom of a wider crisis afflicting the Indian education system. Ills that today beset the system can only be stemmed by a revamp of policies, an overhaul of spent bureaucratic attitudes.

Consequences of Affirmative Action in US Higher Education

This paper seeks to contribute to greater mutual understanding of positive discrimination in India and the US by describing and reviewing some important empirical work that has recently been carried out to evaluate the effects of affirmative action in the US higher education. Until recently the debate on the wisdom of positive discrimination policies has been largely theoretical, appealing to ethical considerations and political-philosophical values. Now, however, systematic empirical evidence on the long-term consequences of affirmative action policies in admissions to US colleges and universities has at last been made available and can be brought to bear on the discussion.

Recruitment of Teachers in Universities

Recruitment of Teachers in Universities A Proposal H SRIKANTH In the debate in EPW on the relevance of UGC-NET, the critics (K M Seethi, June 3, A K Bagchi July 29 and Sajid Ibrahim October 7, 2000) have examined how the external actors like the UGC, the central government, the Hindutva forces, etc, have been facilitating the recruitment of not-so-deserving candidates as teachers in the universities. While the points they have raised are not without merit, I feel they have given very little attention to the actual processes that determine the recruitment of teachers in Indian universities. The NET model is no doubt elitist in its approach, but the earlier system of recruitment was no better. There is a need to ensure that our opposition to the anti-people educational policies of the government does not end up as endorsement of all that is polluted and rotten in the university system.

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