ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Mental Health Legislation

The Mental Health Care Bill, passed in the Rajya Sabha in August 2016, and up for discussion in the Lok Sabha, attempts to address complex issues and integrate divergent perspectives, resulting in uneasy compromise. It is still a work in progress.

Treat, Do Not Shame

The law addressing the needs of people afflicted with HIV/AIDS needs to be enacted urgently.

'Is This Even Work?'

Based on an ethnographic study amongst professional caregivers (nurses, nursing aides and attendants) in three medical establishments in Kolkata, this article explores how reproductive/use-value labour when brought into the public realm as productive/ exchange-value labour survives its association with servile, sexual, menial, feminine labour and continues to remain stigmatised. It examines the nursing labour market to interrogate how the precise nature of the labour performed, structures the perception of the worker of herself as an inferior, performing disreputable, stigmatised labour. Within the grids of gender, class and caste, work and workers mutually constitute each other to define what respectable work is. Such perceived value of work plays a pivotal role in justifying low wages, social recognition and identity as a worker.

At the Brunt of Tuberculosis

Why is India firefighting tuberculosis without adequate data surveillance?

China's One- or Two-child Policy

The announcement of the shift from a one-child to two-child policy at the fifth plenum of the 18th Party Congress of the Communist Party of China in October 2015 has brought the population debate back to the forefront. The social consequences of the policy have been severe, repercussions of which will reverberate for generations to come. This is a lesson for India that it should be warned once more of such coercive measures and their impacts.

Abolishing User Fee and Private Wards in Public Hospitals

Abolition of any type of user fee and the decision to close private wards in hospitals run by the Delhi government may appear to be small steps. These measures are likely to reduce inequity in health services utilisation while signalling the government's intention to bring about changes for the better in health outcomes.

Perpetual Areas of Darkness

Malnutrition deaths in Maharashtra's tribal belt expose indifference of successive governments.

The Problem with 'Targeting'

In its zeal to achieve numerical goals, the government is jeopardising the efficacy of welfare schemes.

Economic Impact of Technology Interventions--Streptokinase

More than 20 lakh patients of ischaemic heart disease-led myocardial infarction can benefit from a life-saving clot-buster drug in India. At the turn of the century, its availability in India was poor and no domestic production existed until the first Council of Scientific and Industrial Research licensee began production in 2001-02. Its price was less than half that of the drug made by a multinational company, the major supplier in the market at that time. Its supply increased to 1,20,000 doses in 2011 after other producers entered the market. Prices dropped by more than 50%. The economic impact of streptokinase technologies, or the value that would be lost if the licensee's streptokinase did not exist, is about `580 crore for the patients.

Thrombolytic Treatment for Myocardial Infarction

All authors were formerly at Council of Scientific and Industrial Research HQ, New Delhi. This study looks at the available life-saving treatments for heart attacks and ischaemic heart diseases administered in India, focusing on streptokinase and finding that it is the life-saving clot-buster for the majority of patients. This brings to light that the surgical intervention of angioplasty is more of an income-biased treatment. Public-funded research and development of indigenous streptokinase has directly enabled access to treatment, especially for economically challenged patients.

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