ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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A Bonanza for Corporates

And a trickle-down approach to reinstating livelihoods will mean a K -shaped recovery.

Is Borrowing Relief Ending Too Soon?

The Reserve Bank of India’s loan repayment moratorium, announced at the end of March 2020 and extended to 31 August 2020, was conceptualised and implemented as a COVID-19 crisis-response measure. While the moratorium ended, the crisis has not. Findings from a survey of 1,452 rural microfinance clients in Maharashtra, conducted in July–August 2020, show that a critical majority of borrowers continue to experience significant income deficits, and will not be in a position to service their debts for the foreseeable future.

Fiscal Restraint Trumps Fiscal Stimulus

The 2020 Union Budget has failed to provide any fiscal stimulus based upon the assumption that there is no fiscal space for providing growth stimulus. In doing so, it missed out on the opportunity of leveraging an additional fiscal space of around 10% of the gross domestic product that could have been tapped through revenue and expenditure rationalisation measures.

Inclusive Fiscal Adjustment for Reviving Growth

Unrealistic revenue projections leading to strong expenditure compression is primarily responsible for India’s growth deceleration. Growth will decelerate further without a programme of deep fiscal adjustment. How a fiscal space, amounting to over 6% of the gross domestic product, can be freed through such an adjustment programme is demonstrated. This space can be potentially used for an inclusive public expenditure-led strategy for reviving growth.

Quarterly GDP Estimation

The latest quarterly estimates of gross domestic product by the new National Accounts Statistics methodology are once again in the news for the wrong reasons. With inadequate accurate information available on a quarterly basis, the estimates hardly represent the state of the economy and reflect the effects of demonetisation over the October–December 2016 period.

IMF's Autocritique of Neo-liberalism?

In a recent article published in Finance and Development, an International Monetary Fund magazine, three economists have critically evaluated the policies the IMF promotes. They acknowledge evidence that suggests that economic growth under neo-liberalism is difficult to sustain, that it leads to an increase in inequality, and that continuing inequality is harmful for sustainable (or continuing) growth.

Lost in Its World

There is a refreshing candour in the Economic Survey 2015-16, but there is also an extreme unrealism.

Continuous Revisions Cast Doubts on GDP Advance Estimates

Two recent press releases by the Central Statistics Office substantially revise the new series of National Accounts Statistics. The new releases are more than just routine updates, and entail methodological changes and incorporate new sources of data, perhaps in response to various critiques. Yet, on comparing the advance estimates released with past such estimates, the CSO's latest growth projections once again turn out to be far too optimistic.

Bhutan's Gross National Happiness

Despite Bhutan's deliberate policy direction of promoting non-economic goals embodied in gross national happiness over gross domestic product, does GNH still incorporate the promotion of material well-being through adequate living standards based on economic progress? This article examines whether GDP is an incompatible policy objective or outcome when balanced with GNH's equitable and sustainable economic progress, good governance, ecological protection and cultural preservation policy objectives.
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