ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

General ElectionsSubscribe to General Elections

In Search of a Strong Opposition

Dreamscapes that provide an alternative to right-wing politics cannot be imagined but need to be realised.

Professionalising Election Campaigns

The 2014 and 2019 general elections in India were referred to as “WhatsApp elections,” which had IT cells, bots, and political consultants strategically using data mining tools to build resonant narratives to tell voters what they wanted to hear. By the 2014 national election, the industry was reported to be worth $40–$47 million. Between 2014 and 2018, industry specialists approximated that the number of firms in this market had at least doubled. These unprecedented tools of technological campaigning come with new forms of identifying, targeting, and defining issues of political importance. This article suggests that such developments are turning electoral politics into a thriving business being data-driven, technologically oriented, and having far-reaching implications for democratic processes.

The End of Democracy or a New Resurgence in Pakistan?

Pakistan’s general elections are scheduled to be held in July 2018. Contrary to the popular argument that the Pakistani military has revived complete dominance and hegemony over civilian and electoral politics, fewer people are now buying into the opinion in Pakistan that the military is somehow “better” than democracy. Unlike 1958, 1977, or 1999, when an outright military coup was welcomed and embraced, the options for the military are fewer and limited in 2018.

Brexit and the Future of the UK

Brexit is a Conservative Party policy-idea that got out of hand. The collapse of the centrist and liberal Tory leadership created a vacuum for hardliners within the party, in the right-wing media, and in other smaller parties to occupy that space, and call for the reinvigoration of British exceptionalism through Brexit. Unfortunately, a political and constitutional crisis besets the United Kingdom, reducing the reality of British exceptionalism to Little England isolationism.
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